VPR Wins Three National Journalism Awards

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A podcast exploring the status of Abenaki Native Americans in Vermont and a video that uses Legos to explain the Iowa caucus, and breaking news coverage of the Northeast Kingdom EB-5 scandal have won Vermont Public Radio three national journalism awards for its work in 2016.

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Best News Documentary: “What is the status of the Abenaki Native Americans in Vermont today?”

Each month, the podcast Brave Little State answers a question submitted by a listener and voted on by the community. The winning piece took on the question question: “What is the status of the Abenaki Native Americans in Vermont today?”.

Angela Evancie, the podcast’s host and creator, says the show’s people-powered model, which was pioneered by WBEZ’s Curious City, has opened up a radical new way of reporting.

“In the case of this story about Vermont’s Abenaki, a seemingly simple question prompted complicated conversations about how the native community sees — and doesn’t see — itself in contemporary Vermont,” Evancie said. “I was so grateful to the Abenaki leaders who opened up their homes and tribal headquarters to me, and trusted me to share a small part of their story.”

See the full report here.

VPR: Coming To Terms With Vermont’s Dark History Of Eugenics

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VPR’s Vermont Edition devoted June 7th’s broadcast to an interview with Dartmouth College senior Mercedes de Guardiola. Mercedes spoke on the State of Vermont’s Eugenics Survey at the State Archives just the week before (see Sokoki Sojourn’s post here). The original 6/7/17 VPR article includes 34 minutes of audio – please listen carefully by clicking here.

Vermont’s prominent role in the American eugenics movement of the early 20th century is an often overlooked part of the state’s history.  The state’s brutal history of sterilization, forced institutionalization, and racist pseudoscience is the focus of a new academic paper by our guest.

We’re joined by Dartmouth College senior Mercedes de Guardiola. Her thesis covering the eugenics movement in Vermont is “Blood has told”: The Eugenical Campaign in the Green Mountain State.

Broadcast was live on Wednesday, June 7, 2017 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

VPR: Dartmouth Student Researches Vermont’s History Of Eugenics

Click here for the audio on VPR News’ The Frequency.

In the early 20th century, Vermont was among a group of states that had policies on the books based on eugenics — the idea that the human population could be controlled to bring out what were considered “desirable” characteristics.

Mercedes de Guardiola, a student at Dartmouth College, wrote her senior thesis on the history of eugenics in Vermont. Though the study of eugenics has since been discredited, when the policies were in effect, they resulted in the sterilization of some Vermonters.

De Guardiola is presenting her work Wednesday evening at the Vermont State Archives in Middlesex. [Note: this took place last night, 5/31/2017]

VPR’s Henry Epp spoke with de Guardiola about the origins of Vermont’s eugenics policy, its lasting effect on the state and what’s been done in the years since to reckon with this period in Vermont’s history.

Aln8bak: Wearing Our Heritage, at the Flynn Center

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A new exhibit at the Amy E. Tarrant Gallery highlights the wearable art of the Abenaki population in and around Vermont.

“Alnobak: Wearing Our Heritage” opened Saturday with a discussion by co-curators Vera Longtoe Sheehan of the Vermont Abenaki Artists Association and Eloise Beil of the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum. The exhibit will be on display through June 17.

Read the full article in the Burlington Free Press.

VPR also picked up the story of the exhibit. See their coverage here.

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Vermont PSB Grants Abenaki Tribes Role in Vermont Yankee Sale Review

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Howard Weiss-Tismann on VPR filed this story (excerpt below):

The Public Service Board says the Missisquoi Abenaki Tribe can take part in the regulatory hearings for the proposed sale of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant.

There are four state-recognized Abenaki tribes in Vermont, and the Public Service Board on Friday said the Missisquoi Tribe can take part in the hearings for the proposed sale to the industrial demolition company NorthStar Holdings. The board has already agreed to allow the Elnu Tribe, from southern Vermont, to intervene in the state hearings.

William Brotherton is a member of the Missisquoi Abenaki Tribal Council, and he says the northern tribe has a stake in the restoration of the Vernon site. “We have been diligent in making sure that our sites up north are protected and preserved, and so we wanted to be part of this process,” Brotherton said.

Mike Faher of VTDigger filed this story (excerpt below):

Two Native American tribes have won the right to be involved in the state’s review of the proposed sale of Vermont Yankee. The Vermont Public Service Board has ruled that both the Elnu Abenaki and Abenaki Nation of Missisquoi can act as “intervenors” in the state’s consideration of the plant’s purchase by NorthStar Group Services, a New York decommissioning company.

Both NorthStar and current owner Entergy had objected to the Missisquoi Abenaki’s intervention. But the Public Service Board sided with the tribe, saying its concerns about future use of the power plant site are relevant to the matter at hand.

In its request for intervenor status, the Swanton-based Missisquoi nation had summed up its concerns this way: “Our tribe wishes to participate in the process that will determine how the former nuclear power plant site is utilized in the future in order that we safeguard the heritage of our past.”

Mike’s story has also been picked up by the Brattleboro Reformer.

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Note: Elnu Abenaki, in keeping with its prior intra-Tribal agreements, will be standing in all of these proceedings as proxy for Nulhegan and Koasek Abenaki Tribes as well. We have agreed to keep tribal leadership in open communication and conference as we address mutual concerns.

Latest on Proposed VT Yankee Sale by Entergy to NorthStar

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With the proposed sale of the shuttered nuclear power plant known as Vermont Yankee in Vernon on the Kwanitekw, there has been a flurry of news coverage about the regulatory process and related interests. As noted on this blog, activity in this sensitive and sacred area of Sokwakik brings concern to Native people here in n’dakinna. Below are a few of the latest articles:

VTDigger 03/03/2017 https://vtdigger.org/2017/03/03/vermont-yankee-sale-review-attracts-crowd/

VTDigger 03/07/2017 https://vtdigger.org/2017/03/07/feds-commit-vermont-public-meeting-yankee-sale/

VPR.net 02/28/2017 http://digital.vpr.net/post/psb-sets-march-14-first-hearing-vermont-yankee-sale#stream/0

The last cited article reports that the first of two planned public hearings by the VT PSB will be held on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at the Vernon Elementary School, across the road from the plant.

The NRC has committed to holding a local meeting sometime soon, after much pressure. A date has not been set yet.

Marlboro VT Supports Change to Indigenous Peoples’ Day

From VPR’s Town Meeting recap and updates:

Update 4:00 p.m. Kelly Salasin, who has been busy tweeting from Marlboro’s marathon Town Meeting session, says, after six-plus hours, “participatory democracy is petering out.” Salasin says voters have passed an article proclaiming the second Monday of October Indigenous Peoples’ Day instead of Columbus Day.

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And from Brattleboro’s weekly The Commons:

“Another article, which proclaims the second Monday of October to be Indigenous Peoples’ Day, rather than Columbus Day, also passed. It used the same language as an article that will be voted upon at Brattleboro’s Representative Town Meeting later this month.”