Testimony for VT S.68, An Act Regarding Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Video links for ORCA Media/CCTV coverage of Committee hearings – testimony and debate – for S.68  of the 2019-2020 Session.

1. Senate Committee on Government Operations. S.68 – Indigenous People’s Day. Recorded February 28, 2019.

2. House Committee on General, Military, and Civil Affairs. S.68 Indigenous Peoples’ Day recorded April 10, 2019.

 

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S.68 Passed In the VT Senate Today: Indigenous Peoples’ Day

S.68 passed vt senate

This afternoon (03.21.2019) S.68, “An act relating to Indigenous Peoples’ Day” passed with its third reading in the Senate chamber of the Vermont legislature. The bill will now move over to the House of Representatives for a similar consideration. Kchi wliwni – with great thanks to everyone who has been in support of this timely and worthy effort!

Action to Support H.119, an Act for Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Link to bill description page

The bill as introduced this session by principal sponsors Reps. Brian Cina and James Masland has 28 co-sponsors. It was introduced on Jan. 30, 2019 and sent to the House Committee on General, Housing, and Military Affairs. Thank you Brian and Jim! From Rep. Cina last Wednesday:

“Just wanted to let you know that the Indigenous Peoples Day bill has been introduced! It is time to mobilize our networks and communities to email members of the House General, Housing, and Military Affairs Committee! We need to ask them to take the bill off the wall, to gather testimony, and to finally pass this bill so that we do not have to rely on a proclamation from the Governor any more.”

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Bills in Committee are said to be “on the wall” – quite literally tacked to the bulletin board. To proceed, they have to be taken up by the Committee, testimony solicited, amendments offered (if any), and voted out to the full House Chamber. This is then repeated in the House, then the bill is sent to the Senate. I am told that Chair Thomas Stevens is favorably inclined, so that’s a good start. As Brian said, we need to contact the GHMA Committee and express support for taking action on H.119. Names and emails are below:

This is the page for the House Committee on General, Housing, and Military Affairs.

Chair Thomas Stevens tstevens@leg.state.vt.us

Vice-Chair Joseph “Chip” Troiano ctroiano@leg.state.vt.us

Ranking Member Diana Gonzalez dgonzalez@leg.state.vt.us

Matthew Birong Jr. mbirong@leg.state.vt.us

Marianna Gamache mgamache@leg.state.vt.us

Clerk Mary E. Howard MHoward@leg.state.vt.us

John Killacky jkillacky@leg.state.vt.us

Emily Long elong@leg.state.vt.us

Randall Szott rszott@leg.state.vt.us

Tommy Walz twalz@leg.state.vt.us

Here’s all the email addresses together if you want to send a group email (copy and paste all at once). Simply express your positive support for taking up H.119 in Committee.

tstevens@leg.state.vt.us

ctroiano@leg.state.vt.us

dgonzalez@leg.state.vt.us

mbirong@leg.state.vt.us

mgamache@leg.state.vt.us

MHoward@leg.state.vt.us

jkillacky@leg.state.vt.us

elong@leg.state.vt.us

rszott@leg.state.vt.us

twalz@leg.state.vt.us

 

Thank you for your help with this! I will keep you posted as the bill progresses.

 

Decolonizing Thanksgiving: an American story Connects to Brattleboro, VT

An interview with Olga Peters on her Green Mountain Mornings show at Brattleboro’s WKVT radio. This is the first in what will become a series of Sokoki Sojourn: Live on the air. We will explore Sokoki-inspired topics over a broad range of interests (mostly local, but occasionally further afield) including historical, linguistic, geographic, contemporary, political, cultural… (it’s all cultural…)

November 15, 2018: Rich Holschuh shares his thoughts on Brattleboro’s connections to the story of the Pilgrims and “The First Thanksgiving.” He talks about the complexities of decolonization. Holschuh then shares the Abenaki word to express gratitude. Holschuh operates the blog Sokoki Sojourn.

Podcast here (thank you Olga!).

Words and Abenaki Heritage in Wantastegok

abenaki words project roundtable poster

Read: Press Release_ The Roundtable Discussion Series, Words & Abenaki History

See the Facebook Event page here.

Decolonizing Museums is Forum Focus

Catlin-Legutko-Cinnamon-abbe-museum-mtdesertislander

Abbe Museum President and CEO Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko will discuss decolonizing museum practice and encouraging collaboration among indigenous peoples and the museum field at College of the Atlantic’s Human Ecology Forum in McCormick Lecture Hall on Tuesday, Feb. 13, at 4:10 p.m.

The Abbe Museum’s mission is to inspire new learning about the Wabanaki Nations with every visit. In August 2015, the museum completed its most ambitious strategic plan to date, committing to develop and implement decolonizing practices in a museum setting.

During her talk, Catlin-Legutko will discuss that nature of decolonizing museum practice and how it offers opportunities for Wabanaki people to feel connected to the Abbe, promote cultural authority, and encourage collaboration and involvement with and between tribal community members and the museum field. Also, she will discuss the role of the leader in a decolonizing framework, which requires power-sharing skills and a commitment to developing group and personal cultural competencies.

Read the full article in the Mount Desert Islander.

This Reconciliation Is For The Colonizer

Indigenous-Motherhood-Article

Note: Strong medicine follows…

*****

This reconciliation is not our reconciliation.

Because.

The only reconciliation that exists for us, as Indigenous nations, is the reconciliation we need to find within ourselves and our communities, for agreeing and complying to this madness for so long.

The only reconciliation that exists for us, is the reconciliation needed to forgive our families, our loved ones, for acting like the colonizer.

The only reconciliation we need. Is a reconciliation that doesn’t involve white skinned handshakes and five dollar handouts for our lands.

Read the full statement by Andrea Landry at The Wrong Kind of Green.