Testimony at VTNDCAP’s Hosting of the NRC in Brattleboro

On May 25, 2017, the Vermont Nuclear Decommissioning Citizens Advisory Panel (VTNDCAP) hosted members of the Federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at Brattleboro Area Middle School’s (BAMS) multipurpose room. On the agneda were presentations and a public comment period for the proposed sale of Vermont Yankee (VY) by Entergy  to Northstar Group Services (Vermont Public Service Board Docket # 8880). This author, representing Elnu Abenaki, with the Nulhegan and Koasek Abenaki, offered testimony in support of our participation in the procedure.

Video thanks to Brattleboro Community Television.

Is Nothing Sacred? Archaeological Reviews and Tribal Lands

willits ca aerial pomo lands

The Northern Pomo people of California thrived in the lush wetland valley known as Bito’m-kai for millennia, fishing salmon from percolating creeks, gathering natural medicines and managing natural resources to feed thousands.

By the time anthropology researcher Samuel Barrett arrived in the early 1900s, many of the Pomo village sites he assiduously recorded had been abandoned. Barrett noted that the village of Yami, on the south shore of the valley, once “supported a considerable Indian population.”

More than a century later, state road building officials emailed chairmen of the Pomo tribes: Yami had been affected during nighttime construction of the Willits Bypass, a $300 million, 5.9-mile roadway that would cleave the valley. The village site had not been recorded by the California Department of Transportation’s archaeologists. Contractors had pierced it with 1,100 wick drains burrowing 60 feet underground and covered the area with tons of fill dirt.

Although it received no national media coverage, the 2013 destruction of Yami presaged what happened at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Sept. 3 – one of the most infamous days of the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. With cameras rolling, contractors started pushing dirt over burial sites within view of protesters.

Read the full report by Mark Dadigan in Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting.

VT Nuclear Decommissioning Citizens Advisory Panel: VT NDCAP Mtg 3/23/17

The Vermont Nuclear Decommisioning Citizens Advisory Panel held a meeting at the BAMS multipurpose room Thursday evening, March 23, 2017, to begin to address PSB Docket #8880. The case concerns the sale of the shuttered VT Yankee nuclear power plant (VY) in Vernon, VT, by Entergy Corp. to NorthStar Group Services. Elnu Abenaki have been granted Intervenor status by the PSB and will be participating in the discussions about the site, its restoration, and proposals for its subsequent use. This author offered a statement in support of Abenaki concerns as the process begins; that testimony can be found at 1:53:15 in the video from Brattleboro Community TV.

NorthStar Files Federal Application for Vermont Yankee Sale

A New York company has taken another big step toward purchasing Vermont Yankee. NorthStar Group Holdings has filed an application with the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission to acquire the license of the shut-down Vernon plant. The request was filed jointly with Entergy, the facility’s current owner.

Encompassing more than 200 pages, the application is a comprehensive attempt to convince the NRC that NorthStar has the expertise and the financial wherewithal to clean up the plant decades earlier than Entergy had planned.
The bottom line, administrators contend, is that “this transfer is desirable and of considerable benefit to the citizens of Vermont.”

Full story by Mike Faher in the Brattleboro Reformer.

Mi’kmaq Council Member John Joe Sark: Land Sale in Violation

keptin-dr-john-joe-sark-epekwitk-mikmaq

Ancestral sites and indigenous rights are being compromised in many places and under many pretenses. Keptin Dr. John Joe Sark challenges another instance in Mi’kmaki at Prince Edward Island.

I read with interest the article published in the Charlottetown Guardian in reference to Mi’kmaq sacred burial grounds in Alexandra. Thank you for publishing the statements made by the minister’s office for the record.

It appears that the provincial archeologist and Secretariat of Aboriginal Affairs for the Province of P.E.I. did little research before inaccurate conclusions and statements were made.  The eight digit map co-ordinates for these sites are in government records and the archives.

The places she refers to have historical names. The permanent fishing encampment is called Wji”kijek on Oejecucch and is nestled between the Acadian settlements of Anse au Matelot and Le Morais. The Mi’kmaq portages are in Crown deeds of property and are very likely treaty rights.

Read the full report in The Guardian.