Dialogue Tour: American Flag Motif in Wabanaki Art

wabanaki flag basket abbe museum

Monday, July 3, 2017 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Tuesday, July 4, 2017 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Location: Abbe Museum, 26 Mount Desert St, Bar Harbor, Maine

For more information: 207-288-3519; abbemuseum.org/events/?view=calendar&month=July-2017

The Abbe Museum’s education team will be hosting a specialized dialogue program surrounding the use of the American flag motif in Wabanaki art. Participants will be prompted with questions to guide the conversation and have opportunities to share insights.

The cost of participating is $9 and includes admission for the rest of the day at our two locations!

There are a limited number of spaces for this one of a kind program. Please register by emailing educator@abbemuseum.org or call 207-801-4081.

Original post in the Bangor Daily News.

Explore Maine History with Maine-Wabanaki REACH & UMaine Art Students

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Join Maine-Wabanaki REACH and UMaine Art Education Students for an interactive story-telling event. We will be exploring events in the shared history of Europeans and their descendants and Wabanaki people.

Participation is limited to a maximum of 30. To enroll, you must RSVP by April 26th to Constant Albertson at constant@maine.edu. First come, first serve, and accepted participants will receive a confirmation email. A list of alternatives will be kept in case of spaces becoming available.

Link to web listing.

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Art Review of Aln8bak: Wearing Our Heritage, at the Amy E. Tarrant Gallery

vera longtoe sheehan twined textiles

In May 2012, then Vermont governor Peter Shumlin signed into law the state recognition of four of Vermont’s Abenaki tribes: the Elnu, Nulhegan, Koasek and Missisquoi. The victory had more than symbolic significance: Formal recognition meant that many of Vermont’s contemporary indigenous artists could begin legally to label their work as “American Indian.” According to Elnu Abenaki member Vera Longtoe Sheehan, access to this designation has opened many new doors — including, at least indirectly, doors to galleries.

Such fraught politics of visibility and authenticity are very much at the heart of “Alnobak: Wearing Our Heritage,” now on view at the Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. The show offers a chronological survey of Abenaki fashion and adornment, from the pre-Champlain era to the present day, accompanied by both modern and historical photographs.

There’s a twist, though: Almost all of the objects on view are contemporary, regardless of the era they were created to represent. While reproductions are often considered to be lesser facsimiles, in this case, the absence of “traditional” artifacts speaks to the 20-plus artists’ ongoing commitment to making their history and heritage come alive.

Read the full article by Rachel Elizabeth Jones in Seven Days.

Aln8bak: Wearing Our Heritage, at the Flynn Center

alnobak wearing our heritage flynn

A new exhibit at the Amy E. Tarrant Gallery highlights the wearable art of the Abenaki population in and around Vermont.

“Alnobak: Wearing Our Heritage” opened Saturday with a discussion by co-curators Vera Longtoe Sheehan of the Vermont Abenaki Artists Association and Eloise Beil of the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum. The exhibit will be on display through June 17.

Read the full article in the Burlington Free Press.

VPR also picked up the story of the exhibit. See their coverage here.

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Wabanaki Basketmakers Fare Well at Heard Indian Art Fair

Jeremy-Frey-Heard-Fair

Three Indian basketmakers from Maine won high honors at a national Indian art fair in Phoenix, Arizona. Jeremy Frey, a Passamaquoddy, won first place in Division B baskets (natural or commercial fibers, any form) and Sarah Sockbeson, a Penobscot, won second place in the same division at the 59th annual Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market, which was March 4-5 in Arizona.

Geo Neptune, a Passamaquoddy, won honorable mention in Division A baskets (natural fibers and cultural forms) and a Judges Choice award in the same division. All three were juried into the 2015 Portland Museum of Art Biennial.

 

Mi’kmawey Debert Cultural Center

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This appears to be a wonderful Mi’kmaq cultural resource site, and no doubt the Centre itself is an even better experience… I will return to take a good look soon.

Partridge Island, across the Bay of Fundy from Cape Blomidon, Nova Scotia, is a site of many Kluskap legends. These stories, passed down through generations of Mi’kmaw people, describe the natural world where our ancestors lived. Many describe local landmarks where our people could find resources necessary for their survival. On Partridge Island you can still discover semi-precious stones like amethyst and jasper, as well as other glass-like rocks our ancestors used in tool- making and other purposes.

No wonder Partridge Island is called Wa’so’q, meaning heaven, in the Mi’kmaw language.

gerald gloade kluskap grandmother