“Put In a Way to Hunt the Indians with Dogs”

“…they would have been greeted with the most vicious dogs…”
-D. Trump (May 30, 2020)
Northampton’s Col. John Stoddard – and his father before him, Rev. Solomon Stoddard – officially recommended the use of large dogs to hunt the Abenaki in the environs of Fort Dummer. Tactics haven’t changed much.
-Col. John Stoddard to Gov. Wm. Dummer (Mar. 27, 1724)
-Rev. Solomon Stoddard to Gov. Jos. Dudley (Oct. 21, 1703)

Enacted Documents for S.68 Indigenous Peoples’ Day and Abenaki Recognition & Heritage Week

Here are pdf versions of: S.68, “An Act relating to Indigenous Peoples’ Day” as signed into law by Governor Phil Scott and his Proclamation for Abenaki Recognition and Heritage Week (May 1-5, 2019).

S.068 signed

19-043 Abenaki Recognition and Heritage Week

 

Indian Tobacco

A small but mighty member of the plant nations stands tall at Wantastegok in the early autumn. It is good, strong medicine – wlinebizon. Elie Joubert tells us: The Abenak call it “Akwi odam8w8gan nebizon” = Stop smoking medicine. Lobelia inflata is made from Indian Tobacco and is great to relieve nicotine urges. It is a homeopathic medicine.

quotidiously

indian tobacco brattleboro 2017

A late appearance by a good friend.

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Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz at UMass April 4, 2017

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz UMass

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz’s public talk focuses on North America in the context of US settler-colonialism. Professor Dunbar-Ortiz will discuss the friction between settler environmentalism and Indigenous knowledge, considering what is required for the environmental movement to develop authentic solidarity with Indigenous Peoples’ struggle for survival, leading to real anti-imperialist environmentalism.

Link to file for the Dunbar-Ortiz Poster.

“The Map is Not the Territory”

Trevien Stanger on learning within the place that finds you. Cultivate the relationship.

trevientravels

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The Polish-American scholar Alfred Korzybski once said that “the map is not the territory.”  We might know where we live by way of naming towns, counties, states, and countries, but that may be the extent of our knowledge:  abstract, temporary, and altogether second-hand.  We begin to mistake such maps for the real, lush, complex, altogether mysteriousness of the territory itself.
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Despite the over-abundance of information on which I do daily dine, (much of it banal and located entirely elsewhere), I find that I’ve grown up in a time of intense amnesia regarding the eco-mythic information of the ground that trembles beneath my feet and the waters that flow through my body and mind.
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I try to inquire: where are the…

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Standing for Love in the Forest of Sandisfield–A Microcosm of the World

Reflections from Jennifer Browdy about the ongoing situation in Sandisfield/Otis State Forest, provoked by the Tennessee Gas/Kinder Morgan CT Expansion Pipeline. From her Transition Times blog…

Transition Times

Last week I went to a meeting of the Conservation Commission in the little hill town of Sandisfield, MA, which has many more trees than residents. Indeed, it has no “town” to speak of, just roads threading their way through forests, streams and lakes, making it ideal habitat for beaver, coyotes, deer, bear, and many other birds and animals, including the occasional moose.

But now, Kinder Morgan has come to Sandisfield.

For more than a year, the local Conservation Commission, composed of three residents who serve as civic volunteers, has been meeting with representatives of the giant multinational fossil fuel corporation, which has gas pipelines running for hundreds, maybe thousands of miles in my corner of the world: the states of Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Maine, and on up to the big commercial tanker port of St. John, New Brunswick.

989861-13505321195442436-clayton-rulliKinder Morgan wants to clear a site…

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