Drew Lopenzina: William Apess, Standing Rock, and the 1833 Mashpee Resistance

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Author and Professor Drew Lopenzina will be giving a presentation at the Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Ave. A, in Turners Falls, MA on Saturday, February 18, at 1 p.m. The event is free and co-sponsored by the Nolumbeka Project and DCR.
William Apess was born close by, on January 31, 1798 in Colrain, MA.

Drew Lopenzina hails from western MA and teaches Early American and Native American literatures at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. His second book, Through an Indian’s Looking Glass (University of Massachusetts Press) is a cultural biography of the Pequot activist and minister William Apess, the first Native American to write and publish his own book length treatises and memoirs in the 1820’s and 30’s. Advance praise by Barry O’Connell states that Lopenzina “brings Apess nearly fully to life, which no one else, among many scholars, has. I know of no better reader of Apess’s own writing.”Lopenzina is also the author of Red Ink: Native Americans Picking up the Pen in the Colonial Period. His essays appear in the journals American Literature, American Quarterly, Studies in American Indian Literature, Native American and Indigenous Studies and others.

 

Drew Lopenzina on William Apess at Full Snow Moon Gathering

drew-lopenzina-william-apess-through-an-indians-looking-glass

“William Apess, Standing Rock, and the 1833 Mashpee Resistance”
Professor Drew Lopenzina, Saturday, February 18, 1 p.m.
Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Ave. A, Turners Falls, MA

Drew Lopenzina hails from western MA and teaches Early American and Native American literatures at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. His recently published second book, Through an Indian’s Looking Glass (University of Massachusetts Press) is a cultural biography of the Pequot activist and minister William Apess, who was born in Colrain, the first Native American to write and publish his own book-length treatises and memoirs in the 1820’s and 30’s. Advance praise by Barry O’Connell states that Lopenzina “brings Apess nearly fully to life, which no one else, among many scholars, has. I know of no better reader of Apess’s own writing.” Lopenzina is also the author of Red Ink: Native Americans Picking up the Pen in the Colonial Period. His essays appear in the journals American LiteratureAmerican QuarterlyStudies in American Indian LiteratureNative American and Indigenous Studies and others.

Free and co-sponsored by the Nolumbeka Project and DCR.

Contact: Diane Dix: 413-773-9818, www.nolumbekaproject.org, nolumbekaproject@gmail.com       

Publisher’s listing here.

 

Always in Fashion: 10,000 Years of Wabanaki Attire

wabanaki attire wiseman missisquoi

Photo credit: Donald Soctomah

Visit the Missisquoi Wildlife Refuge next weekend to join a presentation by Dr. Fred Wiseman examining 10,000 years of Wabanaki clothing and accessories, the first in the 2016 Abenaki Life Program Series.

When: January 29 2016, 6-8 pm

Where: Missisquoi Wildlife Refuge, 29 Tabor Road, Swanton VT 05488 Phone 802-868-4781

Last fall, Dr. Fred Wiseman of Swanton Vermont, as well as the Wapohnaki Museum Cultural Center and the Passamaquoddy Cultural Heritage Museum, co-produced an historic fashion show in Maine.  It featured 24 of Dr. Wiseman’s original and re-created clothing outfits, based on over 25 years of study of historic and ancient Abenaki clothing, headgear, jewelry and fashion accessories.  Anyone interested in learning about a little-known facet of Vermont’s fascinating fashion history will want to join Dr. Wiseman to hear how the event went — and most importantly, how the wearing of ancestral clothing affected the young Native people who wore the attire.  This deeply moving cultural experience has much to teach indigenous people in Vermont about tribal revitalization, and points the way, perhaps, to new directions in Abenaki arts.  Dr Wiseman will share a rich slide show of reconstructed and original prehistoric and historic clothing, including that of an Ice-Age mariner on the Champlain Sea, 1600’s warriors defending their homeland, and 1920’s basket sellers at Highgate Springs.  In addition, he will share some rare examples of historic Abenaki, Penobscot, and Passamaquoddy clothing that have survived until this day.  Dr. Wiseman will also preview the “Alnobak” clothing exhibit that is planned to open in June at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in Vergennes.  Following the presentation there will be time for questions as well as time to view the original Abenaki clothing from Wiseman’s collection.

A Theme of Invisibility: Abenaki History in New Hampshire

professor bob goodby

From the Monadnock Ledger-Transcript:

Franklin Pierce professor Robert Goodby used this statement as his premise during a talk on the Abenaki presence in New England at the Greenville library on Wednesday, Oct. 14th. “There is a theme of invisibility,” said Goodby. “Native history is largely invisible to people, and there is a lack of information about native history.”

“They’re still here,” said Goodby. “They never left.”

Western Abenaki in the 21st Century

jeanne brink abenaki basketmaker

From the Keene Sentinel: Jeanne Brink, Abenaki elder and educator, will discuss the Western Abenaki of the twenty-first century Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015, at 1 p.m. at the Rockingham Library. She will explain the projects that present-day Abenakis are working on to maintain and preserve traditions and language. She will also note how technology affects Abenaki culture….