Defending the Water Protectors: Indigenous Resistance to Hydroelectric Projects in Guatemala

caya simonsen keene stateCaya Simonsen at Keene State College next week, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, 7 pm.

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Strength, Unity, Power: Contemporary Practices in Native Arts

umass strength unity power contemporary practice native arts

The University of Massachusetts, Amherst second-year graduate students in the History of Art & Archictecture Department invite you to an exciting upcoming event:

Strength, Unity, Power: Contemporary Practices in Native Arts

This symposium explores the cutting edge of what artists, museum professionals, and scholars today are doing to promote justice for Native American communities, both in the art world and beyond. The keynote address will be delivered by contemporary Native American artist, Wendy Red Star, and will be followed by a panel discussion withscholars, Dr. Sonya Atalay and Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko, moderated by Dr.Dana Leibsohn.

The symposium is a free event hosted by the History of Art & Architecture department’s second year graduate students. Symposium Date & Time: 15 September, 4pm-6pm, Location: ILC S240 Reception Date & Time: 15 September, 6pm-7pm, Location: Campus Center 165

The Past Comes to Life in South Berwick

unting house museum exhibit

Read the article by ColinWoodward in the Portland Press Herald. 

…Relations with native inhabitants were relatively cordial in the first half-century after colonization, but the situation deteriorated after Massachusetts annexed the region in the 1640s and 1650s, triggering a series of brutal wars between the 1670s and the 1760s, during which many of the colonists’ homesteads and settlements were repeatedly destroyed.

“We associate this place with resilience and stubbornness and independence, and that all has its roots in the 17th century,” said the exhibit’s curator, Nina Maurer. “When you’ve seen your parents’ generation decimated and building a home is an uncertain undertaking, it can mark a place in ways we think you can still see.”

The Old Berwick Historical Society, which runs the Counting House Museum and raised over $100,000 to launch the exhibit, is hosting a related lecture series and history hikes this fall.

On Sept. 28, Dr. Linford Fisher of Brown University will speak on the complex interactions between Native Americans, northern New England settlers and the Atlantic slave trade at 7:30 p.m. at Berwick Academy.

Wabanaki scholar Lisa Brooks of Amherst College will take up the meaning of one of the most brutal of the Anglo-Wabanaki Wars on Oct. 26 at the same time and venue. (More information at oldberwick.org.)

The exhibit will be on display throughout the museum’s 2018 season as well.

“The 17th century tells us something about the struggle for dominance and control and the destiny of a landscape, one where people had to make choices,” Maurer said. “Those are challenges we still have today.”

He’s Back! Drew Lopenzina and William Apess at Greenfield Community College

drew-lopenzina-william-apess-through-an-indians-looking-glass

If you missed Drew Lopenzina’s talk, he’s back in May at GCC.

A New Look at Colrain-born Pequot Indian William Apess

Friday May 5 – 7 pm

Stinchfield Lecture Hall

Professor Drew Lopenzina (Old Dominion University) will focus on the remarkable life, writing and activism of this 19th century Pequot minister. Lopenzina’s newly published book, Through an Indian’s Looking Glass: A Cultural Biography of William Apess, Pequot will be available.

Register online

via Prof. Lisa Brooks, Associate Professor of English and American Studies. Chair, Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies Program

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz at UMass April 4, 2017

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz UMass

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz’s public talk focuses on North America in the context of US settler-colonialism. Professor Dunbar-Ortiz will discuss the friction between settler environmentalism and Indigenous knowledge, considering what is required for the environmental movement to develop authentic solidarity with Indigenous Peoples’ struggle for survival, leading to real anti-imperialist environmentalism.

Link to file for the Dunbar-Ortiz Poster.