He’s Back! Drew Lopenzina and William Apess at Greenfield Community College

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If you missed Drew Lopenzina’s talk, he’s back in May at GCC.

A New Look at Colrain-born Pequot Indian William Apess

Friday May 5 – 7 pm

Stinchfield Lecture Hall

Professor Drew Lopenzina (Old Dominion University) will focus on the remarkable life, writing and activism of this 19th century Pequot minister. Lopenzina’s newly published book, Through an Indian’s Looking Glass: A Cultural Biography of William Apess, Pequot will be available.

Register online

via Prof. Lisa Brooks, Associate Professor of English and American Studies. Chair, Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies Program

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz at UMass April 4, 2017

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz UMass

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz’s public talk focuses on North America in the context of US settler-colonialism. Professor Dunbar-Ortiz will discuss the friction between settler environmentalism and Indigenous knowledge, considering what is required for the environmental movement to develop authentic solidarity with Indigenous Peoples’ struggle for survival, leading to real anti-imperialist environmentalism.

Link to file for the Dunbar-Ortiz Poster.

Drew Lopenzina: William Apess, Standing Rock, and the 1833 Mashpee Resistance

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Author and Professor Drew Lopenzina will be giving a presentation at the Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Ave. A, in Turners Falls, MA on Saturday, February 18, at 1 p.m. The event is free and co-sponsored by the Nolumbeka Project and DCR.
William Apess was born close by, on January 31, 1798 in Colrain, MA.

Drew Lopenzina hails from western MA and teaches Early American and Native American literatures at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. His second book, Through an Indian’s Looking Glass (University of Massachusetts Press) is a cultural biography of the Pequot activist and minister William Apess, the first Native American to write and publish his own book length treatises and memoirs in the 1820’s and 30’s. Advance praise by Barry O’Connell states that Lopenzina “brings Apess nearly fully to life, which no one else, among many scholars, has. I know of no better reader of Apess’s own writing.”Lopenzina is also the author of Red Ink: Native Americans Picking up the Pen in the Colonial Period. His essays appear in the journals American Literature, American Quarterly, Studies in American Indian Literature, Native American and Indigenous Studies and others.

 

Drew Lopenzina on William Apess at Full Snow Moon Gathering

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“William Apess, Standing Rock, and the 1833 Mashpee Resistance”
Professor Drew Lopenzina, Saturday, February 18, 1 p.m.
Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Ave. A, Turners Falls, MA

Drew Lopenzina hails from western MA and teaches Early American and Native American literatures at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. His recently published second book, Through an Indian’s Looking Glass (University of Massachusetts Press) is a cultural biography of the Pequot activist and minister William Apess, who was born in Colrain, the first Native American to write and publish his own book-length treatises and memoirs in the 1820’s and 30’s. Advance praise by Barry O’Connell states that Lopenzina “brings Apess nearly fully to life, which no one else, among many scholars, has. I know of no better reader of Apess’s own writing.” Lopenzina is also the author of Red Ink: Native Americans Picking up the Pen in the Colonial Period. His essays appear in the journals American LiteratureAmerican QuarterlyStudies in American Indian LiteratureNative American and Indigenous Studies and others.

Free and co-sponsored by the Nolumbeka Project and DCR.

Contact: Diane Dix: 413-773-9818, www.nolumbekaproject.org, nolumbekaproject@gmail.com       

Publisher’s listing here.