Judy Dow on Eugenics at Holyoke College Oct. 30th

judy dow mount holyoke eugenics oct 30

On Monday, 10/30/2017, Judy Dow, Abenaki activist and educator, will be speaking at Mount Holyoke College on the topic of “Is our future really our history?  eugenics of the past and today.”  The talk is part of the Fall seminar series sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences.  pdf here JudyDowOct30MtHolyoke

Time: 4:30 p.m. (refreshments served at 4:15 p.m.)
Location: Cleveland Room L2, Mount Holyoke College
Open to the public!
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The Wabanaki People Are Taking Back Their Narrative

Cultural preservation is self-preservation for Native communities. An upcoming film from the Upstanders Project, “Dawnland,” explains just that.

The documentary, now in post-production, follows the journeys of those involved in a truth and reconciliation process in Maine involving the Wabanaki people. The documentary examines the history and the implications of the removal of Native children from their homes in the US.

From boarding schools in the 1800s to foster care today, Native children have repeatedly been separated from their families. In Maine, the Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission formed in 2012 to trace the abuses experienced by Native children since the Indian Child Welfare Act was enacted in 1978.
As early as 1975, a US Senate report found that Native children were 19 times more likely to be removed by child welfare workers than non-Native children. Today, Native children are still twice as likely to be taken from their homes and placed in foster care. Research has suggested this practice can lead to even greater isolation and erasure of indigenous culture.

The stories of Native children in foster care are peppered with horrific and unusual punishments, including not receiving food and being subject to physical harm as well as emotional and sexual abuse.

To tell these stories today, “Dawnland” has tapped advisers and consultants to help ensure the representation of the Wabanaki is accurate. Chris Newell is one of the advisers — he ensures the film is “culturally competent to the collective cultures of the Wabanaki territory.” Newell — born and raised in Motahkmikuhk, an Indian township in Maine — considers the story of Dawnland not his own, but rather the story of many of the people he grew up with.

Hear more about cultural preservation in “Dawnland,” by listening to the audio above.

Future Folk shares the stories of communities through the music that they make. It is a co-production of PRI’s The World and the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

Annual Nipmuc Deer Island Memorial (Day of Remembrance)

Via Rick Pouliot at Gedakina:

She:kon/Greetings

We wanted to pass this information along for the 2017 Deer Island Memorial on behalf of the Natick Nipmuc Indian Council.  Folks interested in paddling and/or walking/running should contact Kristen Wyman: kmwyman09@gmail.com

We also wanted to mention that even if you can’t participant as a paddler, runner or walker – please come out and support this important event. In addition to a morning circle at Deer Island, there is an afternoon circle at the Falls in South Natick, followed by a community potluck social. If you can – we know that the paddlers also appreciate being welcomed after the 18 mile paddle; and runners/walkers appreciate the support as they run/walk into South Natick.

Hope to see you on the 7th.

Rick Pouliot  GEDAKINA

*****

Natick  Nipmuc  Indian  Council DEER  ISLAND  MEMORIAL  2017

SACRED  PADDLE  and  WALK Saturday,  October  7,  2017

All  are  invited  for  a  Day  of  Remembrance  in  honor  of  the  Native  peoples forcibly  removed  in October  1675  from  South Natick  and  the  other  “Praying  Towns”  by  the  Massachusetts  Bay Colony,  and  imprisoned  on  Deer  Island  in  Boston  Harbor during  the  resistance  known  as  King Phillip’s  War.  The  few  who  survived  returned  to  their  aboriginal  homelands to  rebuild their lives  and  tribal  nations.  We  remember  the  ancestors’  sacrifice  and  survival  through  ceremony on  Deer  Island,  a  Sacred Paddle  through  Boston  Harbor  up  the  Charles  River  and  a  walk  from Brighton  to  Natick.  The  day  ends  in  prayer  at  the  falls  in South  Natick  and  a  Potluck  Feast  and Social.

Schedule:
8:00  AM Paddlers  meet  at  Community  Rowing,  20  Nonantum  Road,  Brighton,  MA

8:30  AM Paddlers  are  shuttled  to  Deer  Island  for  9:00AM  arrival,  gear-up  &  safety instruction

9:00  AM Welcome  Circle/Discussion  (Spectators  Only)  at  Deer  Island,  190  Tafts  Avenue, Winthrop,  MA

9:30  AM Prayer  and  send-off .  Sacred  Paddle  departs  from  Deer  Island.  Sacred  walkers caravan  to  Brighton.

10:30  AM Walkers  depart  to  the  falls  in  South  Natick

1:30  PM Sacred  Paddle  arrives  at  Community  Rowing ,  20  Nonantum  Rd.  Brighton (Time  is  approximate)

3:00  PM Ceremony  at  the  falls  in  South  Natick ,  58  Eliot  St.,  Natick,  MA

4:00  PM Potluck  Feast  and  Social  at  St.  Paul’s  Episcopal  Church,  39  E  Central  St,  Natick, MA  01760

Special  thanks  to  Gedakina,  Nipmuk  Nashaounk,  and  all  our  volunteers. 

Deer Island Memorial Announcement 2017.docx (2)

Reformer: Schools to Observe Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Chris Mays’ story in the Brattleboro Reformer (09/20/2017) on the recent affirmation by the Brattleboro Town School Board. Link here.

Following the town’s lead, Brattleboro public elementary schools will now be recognizing the second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day in place of Columbus Day.

Brattleboro Town School Board Chairwoman Jill Stahl Tyler said the Windham Southeast Supervisory Union Board meets on Wednesday. The change, if approved there, could come to several school districts including Dummerston, Guilford, Putney and Vernon.

“It will be an interesting discussion of the supervisory union,” said Stahl Tyler. She was speaking at the Sept. 20 meeting where a resolution had been approved by the Brattleboro Town School Board. The document states:

Whereas, at the Town of Brattleboro 2017 annual Representative Town Meeting, the Town unanimously approved a petitioned article to advise the Select Board to proclaim the second Monday in October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day instead of Columbus Day and the Town of Brattleboro Select Board has heeded said advice by adopting a resolution to that effect on April 18, 2017, and

Whereas the Brattleboro Town School Board likewise desires to recognize the Indigenous People of Wantastegok in Sokwakik — the immediate area now known as Brattleboro, Vermont — dwelling here prior to and during the colonization begun by Christopher Columbus in the Western Hemisphere; and

Whereas, there is ample local evidence, including petroglyphs at the West River, demonstrating this area has been inhabited for millennia, long before Europeans began to settle along the Connecticut River and its tributaries, notably at Fort Dummer in Brattleboro in 1724; and

Whereas, the Town of Brattleboro recognizes that this area comprises in part the homelands of Indigenous Peoples including the Abenaki, their allies, and ancestors; and whereas Indigenous Peoples’ Day will provide an opportunity for our community to recognize and celebrate the Indigenous Peoples of our region, in concert with similar celebrations elsewhere; and

Whereas, the Brattleboro Town School Board encourages our public schools, associated educational institutions, businesses, and other institutions to recognize and celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day, and now, therefore, the Brattleboro Town School Board hereby resolves and proclaims that the second Monday in October of each year shall be Indigenous Peoples’ Day in the public elementary schools of Brattleboro.

VPR: Coming To Terms With Vermont’s Dark History Of Eugenics

vpr-vt state hospital waterbury 1900

VPR’s Vermont Edition devoted June 7th’s broadcast to an interview with Dartmouth College senior Mercedes de Guardiola. Mercedes spoke on the State of Vermont’s Eugenics Survey at the State Archives just the week before (see Sokoki Sojourn’s post here). The original 6/7/17 VPR article includes 34 minutes of audio – please listen carefully by clicking here.

Vermont’s prominent role in the American eugenics movement of the early 20th century is an often overlooked part of the state’s history.  The state’s brutal history of sterilization, forced institutionalization, and racist pseudoscience is the focus of a new academic paper by our guest.

We’re joined by Dartmouth College senior Mercedes de Guardiola. Her thesis covering the eugenics movement in Vermont is “Blood has told”: The Eugenical Campaign in the Green Mountain State.

Broadcast was live on Wednesday, June 7, 2017 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

Vermont State Eugenics Survey Presentation May 31, 2017

vt eugenics survey presentation

Link to pdf for event announcement: eugenicspresentation_20170531

“Eugenics and the Vermont State Hospital are subjects with which we, as a state, continue to wrestle,” says Secretary of State Jim Condos. “Archival records provide context for these chapters of our government’s past, some of which are dark. We are pleased to have the opportunity to host two presentations that illustrate how these and other historical records help shed light on these matters.”

May 31 — “Blood has told:” The Push for a “Eugenical Solution” in the Green Mountain State. Scholarship on Vermont’s eugenics movement has largely focused on the Eugenics Survey of Vermont of the 1920s, even though state officials proposed eugenical policies as early as 1912. Mercedes de Guardiola, a senior at Dartmouth College majoring in history, examines why eugenics emerged in Vermont and its impact on Vermont’s eugenical policies over the course of the twentieth century.

From the press release from the VT Secretary of State’s office, which is hosting the event. Full copy here.