Our Beloved Kin: King Philip’s War Informs Today’s Events

lisa brooks amherst our beloved kin

The story of King Philip’s War, which ended [340] years ago, may be central to the history of this place, marked in locations like King Philip’s Hill in Northfield, the Bloody Brook Battle monument in Deerfield, and even King Philip restaurant in Phillipston. The three-year armed conflict is largely blamed on attacks on colonial settlers by Wampanoags and other native “savages.”

But a book released this week by Amherst College associate professor Lisa Brooks, an Abenaki, depicts the prolonged war on a dozen settlements throughout much of the region as more complex. And it’s seen as the result of mistaken assumptions English settlers made about the native tribes.

What’s more, Lisa Brooks’ “Our Beloved Kin” (Yale University Press) is based on written letters and other materials written by those Indians, who are largely assumed to have been illiterate. And the creative, readable telling by this associate professor of English and American studies she describes as a relevant and timely interpretation, suggesting the plight of refugees and racial profiling.

Her history, which traces the interwoven paths of three characters — Wampanoag leader Weetamoo, who as a woman is less known than Metacomet (aka King Philip); James Printer, the persecuted Christian Nipmuc; and Mary Rowlandson, the Puritan woman whose own account of her capture in Lancaster is recast in this deeper interpretation.

Read the full review by Richie Davis in the Greenfield Recorder.

This article also appeared in the Hampshire Gazette on 1/25.

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Turners Falls Mascot Task Force Still Welcoming Submissions

turners-falls-athletics-fields

More than 100 submissions have been received about a new mascot for Turners Falls High School as the Gill-Montague Regional School District moves toward a decision on a replacement for the Indian.

The task force gathering mascot suggestions is still accepting nominations, which so far have ranged from the old Indian logo to elementary school submissions like “coyotes” or “blueberries’’ — which drew a chuckle from school committee members who heard an update this week.

Many people in the community opposed dropping the Indian mascot after some Montague and Gill residents called for a change in late May 2016, arguing the mascot was racist. After a number of discussions and forums, the school board voted to remove the Indian in February 2017, and reaffirmed the decision following a nonbinding referendum in May 2017 that supported restoring the Indian.

Read the full update article by Christie Wisniewski at the Greenfield Recorder.

Maine 2017 Native American Essay Winners

Maine Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap is announcing the winning entries in the 2017 Maine Native American History and Culture Essay Contest today, and congratulates all of the participating students on their accomplishments.

“The goal of this contest is to give students an outlet to show what they’ve learned about the rich history of the Wabanaki peoples of Maine,” said Secretary Dunlap. “We are thankful to the teachers who share this opportunity with their students, and hopeful that our participants will continue to build upon the knowledge they have gained through their Maine Native American history studies.”

Open to students statewide, the annual contest requires participants to explore at least one aspect of Maine Native American history and to write an essay describing what they have learned.

This year’s top contestant in the high school division is Ella Raymond, a freshman at Casco Bay High School in Portland, for her essay titled, “Authenticity, Equity, and Connectedness in Wabanaki Communities.”

At the middle school level, top honors go to Saber Hanington, a seventh-grade student at Windsor Elementary School, for his entry, “Farming of the Dawnsmen.” Second-place is awarded to Collin Joyce, a seventh-grade student at Scarborough Middle School, for his untitled essay depicting Native American resourcefulness.

Secretary Dunlap invites the first-place essayists in each category to be his guests for a day in Augusta. Students will tour the State House complex, including the Maine State Archives, where they will be able to view Maine’s original treaties with native peoples and original field books of early Maine land surveyors.

Maine law Title 20-A s4706 at http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/statutes/20-A/title20-Asec4706.html requires schools to teach Maine Native American history. This contest provides Maine students with a unique opportunity to share what they have learned in their studies. The public can view the essays online at http://www.maine.gov/sos/kids/nativeamerican/winners.htm . To learn more about this contest and other student programs offered by the Office of the Secretary of State, visit http://www.maine.gov/sos/kids/index.htm .

This Reconciliation Is For The Colonizer

Indigenous-Motherhood-Article

Note: Strong medicine follows…

*****

This reconciliation is not our reconciliation.

Because.

The only reconciliation that exists for us, as Indigenous nations, is the reconciliation we need to find within ourselves and our communities, for agreeing and complying to this madness for so long.

The only reconciliation that exists for us, is the reconciliation needed to forgive our families, our loved ones, for acting like the colonizer.

The only reconciliation we need. Is a reconciliation that doesn’t involve white skinned handshakes and five dollar handouts for our lands.

Read the full statement by Andrea Landry at The Wrong Kind of Green.

NHPR and Revisionist Holidays: Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Thanksgiving Word Of Mouth NHPR

Holidays don’t simply spring into existence – they’re conceptualized, created, lobbied for, and passed into law by state and federal lawmakers. On this show, we’re looking at the New Hampshire author Sarah Hale, who helped craft the modern traditions of Thanksgiving.  Also, a holiday that’s still under construction: Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Go to 25:45 in the podcast to hear a discussion of the grassroots movement to re-envision the misrepresented glorification of Columbus Day as Indigenous Peoples’ Day, honoring those who embody the destructive aims of colonization. Featured is commentary Denise Beauregard Pouliot of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki Nation.

See and hear the post on NHPR here.

Global Learning: Navajo Studies at Grammar School This Month

brent chase navajo dineh grammar school putney

Earlier this month at The Grammar School , students learned about Navajo code-breaking, dreamcatchers, cradleboards and much more. It’s part of “Indigenous Ways of Knowing,” the school’s global education theme for this school year. Throughout the year, teachers are incorporating the concept into their curriculums, from Wampanoag history to indigenous number systems.

Eve McDermott, the Putney, Vt., school’s 2nd-grade teacher, said the staff picked the theme for this year because of its focus on learning from the natural world. The school emphasizes outdoor education, she said, which made the theme seem like a perfect fit.

 From Nov. 6 to 10, members of the Navajo Nation of Arizona visited the school to give workshops on Navajo culture. Throughout the week, the visitors worked with different grade levels on various subjects. For example, 8th-graders learned about Navajo rites of passage, while the 3rd- and 4th-graders learned Navajo weaving techniques.
McDermott said the workshops helped the students practice understanding the world through nature. “It’s really important for our kids in this day and age of the screen and of being really removed from many experiences, experiencing things firsthand. This is a real balance to that tendency in our society,” she said. “It kind of brings us back to where our focus should be.”

The week culminated with “In Beauty May I Walk,” a performance by Brent Chase, one of the visitors from the Navajo Nation, melding Navajo music, storytelling and dance. McDermott said the Navajo hoop dance was especially powerful, moving one 2nd-grader to happy tears. “It was just a feeling that you could really relate to, because the energy and the spirit of the hoop dance is really, really powerful in a room to watch it,” she said.

Teachers will continue to incorporate the theme for the remainder of the year, and the students will put on a fundraiser to buy school supplies for The Little Singer School, a K-8 school on the Navajo reservation in Arizona. The Grammar School also hopes to invite Abenaki and Iroquois representatives to give similar presentations to the students.

“We’re still glowing a week later with the spirit of the whole thing. We just can’t wait to have Abenaki and Iroquois come and just learn about their cultures. It’s so important,” McDermott said. “We have a lot to learn from them.”

See the original article by Meg McIntyre in the Keene (NH) Sentinel.