This Land Is Whose Land? Indian Country and the Shortcomings of Settler Protest

abenaki-land-protest-sign

Mali Obomsawin has hit this one out of the park. She brings these truths home to Ndakinna and holds them up clear, bright, and strong. All I can ask is “Read this through carefully, take it to heart, and share widely.” It is ALWAYS about the Land and the People, inseparable.

Why do so few Americans know about Indian Country? Because the government continues to fight Native nations for land. Because American patriotism would be compromised by a full picture of American history. Because there is no one to hold patriotic historians accountable for writing Native people out of history books. The legal and moral foundation of this country is fragile, and by erasing Native people from the public consciousness, the slippery topic of “whose land is whose land,” (and why and how?), can be sidestepped altogether.

Ignorance is an accessible popular tool: it doesn’t require citizens to take up arms, acknowledge or interact with the intended target, leave their comfort zones, or jeopardize their status. As a weapon, ignorance is cheap, deniable, and nearly impossible to trace. Finally, ignorance is passively consumed and passively reproduced, cinching Native invisibility.

Link to the complete article in Smithsonian Folklife.

Full article as pdf: This Land Is Whose Land

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richholschuh

The world is a big place. This is how it appears to me. Your results may differ.

3 thoughts on “This Land Is Whose Land? Indian Country and the Shortcomings of Settler Protest”

  1. I’m reading “A Curse Upon the Nation: Race, Freedom and Extermination in America and the Atlantic World” by Kay Wright Lewis, and to say I’m in shock, even more than normal, would be an understatement… This sentiment above is absolutely true. If people KNEW what happened here, oh, my, god… it would change everything…

    Liked by 1 person

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