Alton Gas: Elnu Abenaki Support for Sipekne’katik, Mi’kmaki

elnu-letter-sipeknekatik-mikmaki

Elnu Tribe of Abenaki has confirmed its support for the Mi’maki community at Sipekne’katik on the Shubenacadie River in Nova Scotia, as they stand in solidarity against the Alton Gas salt cavern storage project. A letter has been sent to the Grandmothers expressing unity and understanding, and upholding the shared responsibilities of the Wabanakiak in their homelands, N’dakinna.

See this post for more background.

Wabanaki Recall Victims of 1724 Maine Massacre

butch philips penobscot elder

Whether it’s by canoe, on foot or in his pickup truck, Butch Phillips always returns to The Pines park each year for a special remembrance. Phillips, 76, is a member of the Penobscot Nation whose ancestors were killed in an Aug. 22, 1724 massacre near the confluence of the Sandy and Kennebec rivers when British soldiers attacked an Abenaki Indian village in a fight to take over the land.

The surviving Abenaki fled, many of them going to live with the Penobscot or the Odanak Indians, and today that is how some of their descendants choose to return to the area where they were killed. For about the last 20 years, members of the Wabanaki Confederacy, an alliance of five Native American nations including the Abenaki and the Penobscot, have returned to the site at The Pines to honor and remember their ancestors.

Story at the Portland Press Herald.

Abbe Museum’s Exhibition Tells Difficult Native Stories

abbe museum birchbark container

If nothing else, Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko wants people who visit the Abbe Museum to leave with one piece of knowledge firmly planted forever in their brain: Native people still live in Maine.

“It’s amazing how many of our visitors don’t realize that,” the museum director said. “They’re always surprised.”

Read about how the Abbe Museum is telling its story in a new way. (via Portland Press-Herald)

Abbe Museum Launches New Strategic Plan

abbe museum bar harbor

Full story at the Mount Desert Islander

The Abbe Museum is the only museum in the world dedicated to telling the story of the Wabanaki. Over 10,000 Native people currently live in Maine, and most are Wabanaki, a confederacy of nations that today consists of the four federally recognized tribes in Maine: Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Micmac and Maliseet. In addition, the Wabanaki includes several bands of the Abenaki tribe, located primarily in New Hampshire, Vermont and Quebec.

“With a mission to inspire new learning about the Wabanaki Nations with every visit, the Museum is trying to do more than just be a cultural and historical institution, which prompted a new vision: The Abbe Museum will reflect and realize the values of decolonization in all of its practices, working with the Wabanaki Nations to share their stories, history, and culture with a broader audience.”

Skowhegan Area Students Learn About Wabanaki Culture

john bear mitchell penobscot skowhegan wabanaki

High school students from Skowhegan, Upper Kennebec Valley and Carrabec high schools got to ‘know’ their Indian neighbors this past Thursday (Nov. 12, 2015). John Bear Mitchell, a member of the Penobscot tribe and associate director of the Wabanaki Center at the University of Maine, used storytelling and humor Thursday to teach high school students about his people and their culture, history and identity in the modern world.

Read the article at the Kennebec Journal and Morning Sentinel.

Vermont Abenaki Host Historic Gathering in Shelburne

abenaki drum circle BFP

For the record, this historic event was held a month and a half ago at the Shelburne Museum. This is the Burlington Free Press’s coverage.

“We’re not extinct. We’re not dead,” [Chief Don] Stevens said. “Abenaki people have always been here, they continue to always be here, and we are very involved with the fabric of Vermont and also the outside of the world.”

Vermont Hosts The Wabanaki Confederacy Conference

abenaki drumsLeading off this morning, the Abenaki bands of Vermont are hosting a gathering of the Wabanaki Confederacy, in this state for the first time in 200 years. Vermont Public Radio’s Vermont Edition talks with Chief Don Stevens of the Nulhegan Band of Coosuk-Abenaki and Professor Fred Wiseman about this momentous and forward-looking event. The Conference will be held at Shelburne Farms in Shelburne, Vermont beginning today, August 19, 2015 through Saturday August 22, 2015; the public is invited to join the celebration all day on Saturday. A Facebook Event page can be found here.