A Story of Survival Amid the Artifacts

robert goodby norma wilson

Archeology provided the backdrop for a story of human survival during a presentation of “Digging into Native History in New Hampshire: Whatever happened to the Abenakis?” at Seabrook Library.

The New Hampshire Humanities Council co-sponsored the library’s presentation by anthropologist Dr. Robert Goodby, associate professor of anthropology at Franklin Pierce University and author of more than 100 reports delving into New England prehistoric archaeology.

Goodby began his presentation to several dozen audience members with an explanation of his passion for finding and studying artifacts. He said his interest in studying anthropology began at the University of New Hampshire but he became engrossed with archaeology when he found a 7,000-year-old object at his first paid archeological dig. He said the experience changed his life.

“Archaeology is about people,” he said. “I asked myself, ‘How can I use this object to find out about people and their stories.’”

Full story at Seacoast Online.

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Ask First and Respect the Answer

Archaeologists have returned to a known burial site to make a second excavation, on the grounds of Seabrook Station on New Hampshire’s coastline. A previous dig there in the 1970’s, as the nuclear power plant was being built, uncovered and removed seven burials; it took over 25 years for those remains to be repatriated. Astoundingly, the current  investigation involved no consultation with the indigenous Abenaki people, descendants of the people who lived and died in this northern New England shore. Action to address this negligence and address the lack, and disregard, of official policy is now being taken.