Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Scientists and Tribes Partner for the Black Ash Nation

emerald ash borer TEK

When Butch Jacobs steps into the woods in search of basket making materials, he does not have a specific type of forest or black ash tree in mind, but he knows it when he sees it. “It’s a unique skill set that cannot necessarily be taught. Some people just have it,” Jacobs said.

Jacobs, a member of the Passamaquoddy Tribe, is one of few remaining basket-tree harvesters in Maine—a longstanding tradition that stretches back to before Europeans arrived on North American shores. Now, the custom faces a threat that may devastate the trees that harvesters like Jacobs seek.

Emerald ash borer, an insect native to Asia, has barreled through ash stands in at least 31 states and three Canadian provinces since it was first documented in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. Black ash, the species basket-tree harvesters target, is especially susceptible to the invasive insect that has already decimated millions of North American , and will soon arrive in Maine.

That spells trouble for Jacobs and many others, for whom ash trees are of critical cultural and economic significance. The black ash is a central element in several Native American and First Nation traditions, including some tribes’ creation stories.

Read the full story by Erin Miller at phys.org.

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A Day in the Life of Paul and Denise Pouliot, Part 2

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An integral part of Native American society is that people are judged not by what wealth they hold, but by what wealth they can give to others. This attitude is clearly expressed by the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People and its nonprofit social and cultural services organization, COWASS (Coos) North America. As Sagamore (sag- 8mor) of this band, Paul Pouliot and his wife Denise are committed to preserve their culture, traditions, and way of life. They have spent their time furthering education regarding the Abenaki people.

Read Part 2 of the story by Cathy Allyn on page 2 of The Baysider newspaper. This is a multi-part story, so watch for more.