Paths to New Hampshire’s Native Past

native new hampshire magazine

…Walking back to a time when foot trails and rivers were the main drag and birch-bark canoes coursed the waters, imagine a shoreline scene of wigwams set aglow from home fires and a moonlit sky. Inside, a circle of people share stories and trade, eating fish and waving away wood smoke — families coming together, celebrating the seasons and each other.

A recent National Geographic Channel special, “America Before Columbus,” notes that, in the 1400s, more people lived on our continent than in all of Europe and they had created “a managed landscape of cities, orchards, canals and causeways.” Likewise, New Hampshire’s Native roots cover every inch of the state, from the wooded realms of the north down to our big central lake and from our seacoast and salt marshes to the Connecticut River in the shadow of Mt. Monadnock. American Indians have lived here since the end of the last ice age, following food cycles, fresh water and fertile ground. The evidence that remains, mostly place names and myth, has become so familiar to us that we sometimes forget the source.

“It’s very important for people to understand that families were living in these places,” says Michael J. Caduto, author of “A Time Before New Hampshire: The Story of a Land and Native Peoples.”

“A lot of people think of Native history as being kind of static or represented by stone tools and bones and other archaeological findings,” he says. “Those artifacts are just evidence of the life that has been here for over 11,000 years — the Abenakis and all of their ancestors.”

See this above-average article by Mark Dionne, and illustrated by Ryan O’Rourke, in this month’s issue of New Hampshire Magazine.

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Day of Remembrance at Peskeompskut with Nolumbeka

day of remembrance peskeompskut nolumbeka

Organized by the Nolumbeka Project: Saturday, May 20, 2017 at the Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls, MA.

• Doors open at 10 a.m. We are offering ample time during the day and between presentations for conversations, personal reflections and individual touring of this historically significant district of Great Falls and the 341st anniversary of the battle that changed the course of King Philip’s War
• 10:30 a.m. – Presentation by Nolumbeka Project Board members David Brule and Nur Tiven.
• 1 p.m – Ceremony officiated by Tom Beck, Medicine Man and Ceremonial Leader
of the Nulhegan – Coosuk Band of the Abenaki Nation.
• Special guests during the day include Loril Moondream of Medicine Mammals and Strong Oak of Visioning B.E.A.R. Circle Intertribal Coalition.

A Day in the Life of Paul and Denise Pouliot, Part 2

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An integral part of Native American society is that people are judged not by what wealth they hold, but by what wealth they can give to others. This attitude is clearly expressed by the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People and its nonprofit social and cultural services organization, COWASS (Coos) North America. As Sagamore (sag- 8mor) of this band, Paul Pouliot and his wife Denise are committed to preserve their culture, traditions, and way of life. They have spent their time furthering education regarding the Abenaki people.

Read Part 2 of the story by Cathy Allyn on page 2 of The Baysider newspaper. This is a multi-part story, so watch for more.

A Day in the Life of Paul and Denise Pouliot

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There is no typical day in Paul Pouliot’s life. When the phone rings, it might be Homeland Security, a state archeologist, the Department of Justice, a social worker from anywhere in the country, or a museum curator. Is he some sort of government mastermind? A genius academic? A think tank guru? Pouliot’s calling surely has elements of all of those, but quite simply, he is a sagamore, the chief of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People.

Read the story by Cathy Allyn on page 5 of The Baysider newspaper. This is a multi-part story, so watch for more.

PS There’s a nice article on ash splint basketmaking on page 3 also!