Three Little Indian Sisters

watso sisters blodgetts landing nh

The daughters of Louis Watso and Katherine Tahamont. The Watso family kept a shop on the shores of New Hampshire’s Lake Sunapee following the turn of the last century.

From the Ne-Do-Ba website:

Louis Watso was born about 1874 and descends from an Abenaki War Chief. He married Katherine Tahamont on 20-Jan-1893. Katherine was born 5-Jan-1878 at Odanak or upstate NY. Louis died in 1959 and Katherine died 18-May-1943. Both are buried in Claremont NH, where they spent much of their lives. This couple had three daughters that grew to adulthood;

  • Jessie born 25-Feb-1897 at Odanak, married Mr. Barton
  • Eva born 7-Jun-1899 at Odanak, married Mr. Perry
  • Mable born about 1900, Married Mr. Turner

The Watso family continues, the Abenaki continue. #respect

Advertisements

Philippe Charland: A New French-Abenaki Dictionary

philippe-charland-abenakis

Au Québec, le nombre de personnes qui parlent l’abénaquis se compte sur les doigts de la main. Philippe Charland est l’un d’eux. En collaboration avec le conseil de bande d’Odanak, l’enseignant lancerait bientôt le premier dictionnaire français-abénaquis. Un outil qui pourrait faciliter l’apprentissage de la langue autochtone pratiquement éteinte.

Un texte de Raphaëlle Drouin

Philippe Charland (qui n’est pourtant pas Autochtone) enseigne l’abénaquis depuis maintenant 10 ans dans les communautés de Wôlinak et d’Odanak, dans le Centre-du-Québec.

Read the full article at Radio-Canada.

Wabanaki Recall Victims of 1724 Maine Massacre

butch philips penobscot elder

Whether it’s by canoe, on foot or in his pickup truck, Butch Phillips always returns to The Pines park each year for a special remembrance. Phillips, 76, is a member of the Penobscot Nation whose ancestors were killed in an Aug. 22, 1724 massacre near the confluence of the Sandy and Kennebec rivers when British soldiers attacked an Abenaki Indian village in a fight to take over the land.

The surviving Abenaki fled, many of them going to live with the Penobscot or the Odanak Indians, and today that is how some of their descendants choose to return to the area where they were killed. For about the last 20 years, members of the Wabanaki Confederacy, an alliance of five Native American nations including the Abenaki and the Penobscot, have returned to the site at The Pines to honor and remember their ancestors.

Story at the Portland Press Herald.