From Cherokee Country To Pequot Shores: Rediscovering Native American Trails

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A great piece on NPR yesterday (June 30, 2017) with a nearly hour-long audio track about early trail systems and their multi-levels of significance. Listen here.

“Long before our modern highways, there was an extensive network of Native American trails up and down the East Coast. This hour, we hear about efforts to map these old trails and find out how they’re helping archaeologists and others learn about the past.

We begin our conversation in former Cherokee country to find out why a North Carolina man and an archaeologist are mapping hundreds of miles of old Cherokee trails. Then we head back to Connecticut’s woods where many Native American tribes used trails to link villages — spurring on trade and facilitating war.”

The Intelligence in All Kinds of Life: Robin Wall Kimmerer

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Kristen Tippett of NPR’s On Being speaks at length with scientist and indigenous citizen Robin Wall Kimmerer, author of Braiding Sweetgrass, Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants.

“Why is the world so beautiful?” This is a question Robin Wall Kimmerer pursues as a botanist and also as a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She writes, “Science polishes the gift of seeing, indigenous traditions work with gifts of listening and language.” An expert in moss — a bryologist — she describes mosses as the “coral reefs of the forest.” Her work opens a sense of wonder and humility for the intelligence in all kinds of life we are used to naming and imagining as “inanimate.” She says that as our knowledge about plant life unfolds, human vocabulary and imaginations must adapt.

Listen to the full episode here.