Ancient Artifacts Discovered on Chittenden Solid Waste Property

chittenden solid waste archaeological find

Rock shards from the Paleoindian Period have been discovered at a sand pit next to Chittenden County’s regional composting facility, less than a decade after concerns about Native American artifacts contributed to the closure of a similar operation in Burlington’s Intervale.

The district acquired the sand pit through eminent domain in 2009 from a private company, Hinesburg Sand & Gravel, and granted the company the right to take sand from the pit for 30 years. The artifacts were discovered as the district sought to amend its Act 250 permit to expand the sandpit’s active excavation area and allow for stormwater improvements related to its Green Mountain Compost facility, according to its application. A portion of the pit is currently used for compost curing and storage, according to the permit documents.

Read the full article by Molly Walsh in Seven Days.

“There Are No Evidences of Indian Settlements in This Town”

VT Phoenix July 7, 1876

From The Vermont Phoenix (Brattleboro, VT) July 7, 1876, an excerpt of the Centennial Address given by the Hon. Charles K. Field.

The final sentence of the paragraph above, following the previous observations, demonstrates the willful, almost ludicrous, elision of Native presence by descendants of the colonizers. The very same paragraph affirms the evidence of long-term indigenous occupation and specific resource-management practices.

No Evidences of Indian Settlements in This Town

vt-phoenix-july-7-1876

The strangest statements may be found in the local newspapers, reflecting the absolute conviction of the times – in the face of self-stated evidence – that there was, and is, no notable indigenous presence.

From The Vermont Phoenix, Brattleboro, VT July 7, 1876.

Abenaki Site at Intervale NH Preserves Native American Encampment

Full story at the Conway Daily Sun:

The Intervale site was once an encampment of  Abenaki, established by them to make and sell baskets to the visitors lured to the White Mountains in the late 19th century. The Abenaki were descended from the original inhabitants of the area; the camp was founded by Odanak Chief Joseph Laurent 1839-1917 (Sozap Lalo, author of New Familiar Abenakis and English Dialogues) and his son Stephen Laurent, postmaster in Jackson, NH.