Vermont Gov. Phil Scott’s Executive Proclamation of Indigenous Peoples’ Day 2017

State of Vermont

Executive Department

A Proclamation

WHEREAS, Indigenous Peoples’ Day was first proposed in 1977 by a delegation of Native Nations to the International Conference on Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations in the Americas; and

WHEREAS, a growing number of cities and towns in the United States have recognized the second Monday of October as “Indigenous Peoples’ Day”, re-imagining Columbus Day as an opportunity to celebrate indigenous heritage and resiliency; and

WHEREAS, Vermont recognizes the historic, cultural, and contemporary significance of Indigenous Peoples of the lands that also became known as the Americas; and

WHEREAS, Vermont recognizes it was founded and built upon lands first inhabited by Indigenous Peoples of this region – the Abenaki, their ancestors and allies – and acknowledges and honors these members of the community.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Philip B. Scott, Governor, do hereby proclaim October 9, 2017 as INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY in Vermont. Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State of Vermont on this 23rd day of August, A.D. 2017.

Philip B. Scott, Governor

Brittney L. Wilson, Secretary of Civil and Military Affairs

Officially posted (at last!) here.

VT Scott Indigenous Peoples Day.

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Full Text of Brattleboro’s Indigenous Peoples’ Day Resolution

RESOLUTION FOR INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY

WHEREAS, at the Town of Brattleboro 2017 Annual Representative Town Meeting, the Town unanimously approved a petitioned article to advise the Selectboard to proclaim the second Monday in October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day instead of Columbus Day; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Brattleboro Selectboard heeds said advice and desires to recognize the Indigenous People of Wantastegok in Sokwakik – the immediate area now known as Brattleboro, Vermont – dwelling here prior to and during the colonization begun by Christopher Columbus in the Western Hemisphere; and

WHEREAS, there is ample local evidence, including petroglyphs at the West River, demonstrating this area has been inhabited for millennia, long before Europeans began to settle along the Connecticut River and its tributaries, notably at Fort Dummer in Brattleboro in 1724; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Brattleboro recognizes that this area comprises in part the homelands of Indigenous Peoples including the Abenaki, their allies, and ancestors; and

WHEREAS, Indigenous Peoples’ Day will provide an opportunity for our community to recognize and celebrate the Indigenous Peoples of our region, in concert with similar celebrations elsewhere; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Brattleboro encourages schools, other educational institutions, businesses, and other institutions to recognize and celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day,

NOW, THEREFORE, the Brattleboro Selectboard hereby resolves and proclaims that the second Monday in October of each year shall be Indigenous Peoples’ Day in the Town of Brattleboro.

Dated this 18th day of April, 2017.

Brattleboro Selectboard:

____________________________________

Kate O’Connor, Chair

____________________________________

Brandie Starr, Vice-Chair

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Tim Wessel, Clerk

____________________________________

John Allen

____________________________________

Dave Schoales

Link to pdf: BrattleboroIndigenousPeoplesDayResolutionFinalText

 

A Small Thing But Highly Symbolic: Brattleboro to Observe Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Holschuh-Selectboard-IPD

It’s official.

The town will now recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day on the second Monday in October in place of Columbus Day.

“It’s a small thing but it’s highly symbolic for Brattleboro to make this move forward,” said Rich Holschuh, a resident of the town who’s a member of the Vermont Commission on Native American Affairs. “I hope we can take it statewide eventually. Brattleboro is the beginning of colonization in this state at Fort Dummer.”

Holschuh said he is looking forward to exploring how to observe and celebrate the holiday. He had secured enough signatures on a petition to signal a vote via an article at annual Representative Town Meeting last month.

Read the full article by Chris Mays at the Brattleboro Reformer here.

Brattleboro to Vote on Indigenous Peoples’ Day March 25, 2017

Brattleboro’s Representative Town Meeting members will be considering Article 22 on the 2017 Annual Warning this Saturday, March 25th, 2017. From Chris Mays’ article in the Brattleboro Reformer’s article following last Wednesday’s (3/15) informational meeting:

“The last article asks whether the town should advise the Select Board to proclaim the second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day in place of Columbus Day.

“Why Indigenous Peoples’ Day?” asked Rich Holschuh, who petitioned for inclusion of the article. “It’s because its time has come. It’s a good year, with Standing Rock in the headlines and the move nationwide to embracing those who have not been embraced in the past. It’s a nationwide movement. It’s going across the country.”

He said two to three dozen communities have already made the change. Last week, the town of Marlboro did.

“They were the first in the state,” Holschuh said. “I was hoping to be first. We can be second. Why Brattleboro? I think Brattleboro can offer a great deal of leadership on this because this is where colonization began in the state. Fort Dummer, 1724. This is where the process of displacing the Indigenous People of this area, which are the Abenaki, began and it continues. It’s highly symbolic and I think it’s an important thing to do.”

Daniel Christmas, First Mi’kmaw Appointed to the Canadian Senate

dan-christmas-mikmaw-senator

Senator Daniel Christmas, First Mi’kmaw Appointed to the Canadian Senate

Dan Christmas never knew what or where his journey would take him. He just knew his father’s teachings would buoy him along the way — and that was going to be more than good enough.

The oldest of six children, Christmas often found himself in a leadership role in his Membertou-based family at a young age. He encouraged his younger siblings, gave a hand to his mother around the house when needed, and even joined his dad at his various work spots.

But when Christmas and his family were hit with the unexpected passing of their father, he was thrust into what would be his eventual full-time calling in life — leading — and he hasn’t looked back since.

Read more at danielnpaul.com.

Put These Statements Together: Can You Say Termination?

Trump considering Senator Heitkamp of North Dakota for Cabinet (Interior)

Heitkamp Statement on Dakota Access Pipeline Protests

Dakota pipeline fight is ‘not winnable,’ ND Democratic Sen Heidi Heitkamp

Then add in this interview with Senator Heitkamp in today’s Indian Country Today newsletter; I am blown away.

And throw this on top, to fill out the portent: Trump advisors aim to privatize oil-rich American Indian reservations.

VPR Coverage for Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Vermont

rich_holschuh-vpr-weisss-tisman-20161010

A full story was assembled after an interview by Vermont Public Radio reporter Howard Weiss-Tisman on Friday, Oct. 7, the day after Gov. Peter Shumlin issued the Proclamation for Indigenous Peoples’ Day in place of Columbus Day. The story was posted today, Oct. 8th (audio to follow). Read it here.

Several other media stories have been released following the Oct. 6, 2016 action by Vermont Gov. Shumlin. WPTZ-NBC TV Channel 5 in Burlington rolled in the ongoing exploration of similar action in Hartford, VT.

Clink link for full report:

WPTZ – NBC

NPR