Long River, Deep History

Long River Deep History poster

A discussion with Lisa Brooks, PhD, “Our Beloved Kin”, and Christine Delucia, PhD, “Memory Lands”.

UM Student Art Project Teaches Importance of Community Service

Art-Education

This year, seven art education students found inspiration in Wabanaki folklore for their University of Maine Art Education Student Outreach project. Students enrolled in Professor Constant Albertson’s AED 474: Topics in Art developed original linoleum blocks and used them to print t-shirts intended to be sold on campus and in the community. All of the proceeds will go toward supporting the programs and activities that the Gedakina, Inc. fosters in Native American communities across New England.

“As I was designing the course I researched many Wabanaki issues,” Albertson said. “The students talked it over and did research. We were very excited to work with Gedakina. We didn’t want the product to be another bauble, something that you shove in a junk drawer, and we thought it would be important to use relevant images and symbols.”

In AED 474, Albertson hoped to teach her students skills in collaboration, negotiation and leadership, while showing them how to integrate an art curriculum with community service efficiently.  “Art is critical to creating culture and community,” Rochelle Lawrence, an art education student enrolled in AED 474, said. “It creates awareness of the people, animals, nature and history that have come before you.”

Gedakina, which means “Our world, a way of life” in the Wabanaki language, works to bring like-minded community members and allies together to support and empower Native American and indigenous youth. They also work to challenge racism and continual colonialism and encourage inclusiveness and diversity.

Read the full article by Olivia Shipsey in the Maine Campus.

Lisa Brooks’ Our Beloved Kin Thursday at GCC

our beloved kin cover lisa brooks

A lecture with Lisa Brooks, author of “Our Beloved Kin” : A New History of King Phillips War.

7 pm Thursday, February 22, 2018  |  Greenfield Community College, Stinchfield Lecture Hall

Note: 5pm book signing at World Eye Books in Greenfield, MA

Free and open to the public!

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In Our Beloved Kin, Lisa Brooks recovers a complex picture of war, captivity, and Native resistance during the “First Indian War” (later named King Philip’s War) by relaying the stories of Weetamoo, a female Wampanoag leader, and James Printer, a Nipmuc scholar, whose stories converge in the captivity of Mary Rowlandson. Through both a narrow focus on Weetamoo, Printer, and their network of relations, and a far broader scope that includes vast Indigenous geographies, Brooks leads us to a new understanding of the history of colonial New England and of American origins. Brooks’s pathbreaking scholarship is grounded not just in extensive archival research but also in the land and communities of Native New England, reading the actions of actors during the seventeenth century alongside an analysis of the landscape and interpretations informed by tribal history.

Annual Nipmuc Deer Island Memorial (Day of Remembrance)

Via Rick Pouliot at Gedakina:

She:kon/Greetings

We wanted to pass this information along for the 2017 Deer Island Memorial on behalf of the Natick Nipmuc Indian Council.  Folks interested in paddling and/or walking/running should contact Kristen Wyman: kmwyman09@gmail.com

We also wanted to mention that even if you can’t participant as a paddler, runner or walker – please come out and support this important event. In addition to a morning circle at Deer Island, there is an afternoon circle at the Falls in South Natick, followed by a community potluck social. If you can – we know that the paddlers also appreciate being welcomed after the 18 mile paddle; and runners/walkers appreciate the support as they run/walk into South Natick.

Hope to see you on the 7th.

Rick Pouliot  GEDAKINA

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Natick  Nipmuc  Indian  Council DEER  ISLAND  MEMORIAL  2017

SACRED  PADDLE  and  WALK Saturday,  October  7,  2017

All  are  invited  for  a  Day  of  Remembrance  in  honor  of  the  Native  peoples forcibly  removed  in October  1675  from  South Natick  and  the  other  “Praying  Towns”  by  the  Massachusetts  Bay Colony,  and  imprisoned  on  Deer  Island  in  Boston  Harbor during  the  resistance  known  as  King Phillip’s  War.  The  few  who  survived  returned  to  their  aboriginal  homelands to  rebuild their lives  and  tribal  nations.  We  remember  the  ancestors’  sacrifice  and  survival  through  ceremony on  Deer  Island,  a  Sacred Paddle  through  Boston  Harbor  up  the  Charles  River  and  a  walk  from Brighton  to  Natick.  The  day  ends  in  prayer  at  the  falls  in South  Natick  and  a  Potluck  Feast  and Social.

Schedule:
8:00  AM Paddlers  meet  at  Community  Rowing,  20  Nonantum  Road,  Brighton,  MA

8:30  AM Paddlers  are  shuttled  to  Deer  Island  for  9:00AM  arrival,  gear-up  &  safety instruction

9:00  AM Welcome  Circle/Discussion  (Spectators  Only)  at  Deer  Island,  190  Tafts  Avenue, Winthrop,  MA

9:30  AM Prayer  and  send-off .  Sacred  Paddle  departs  from  Deer  Island.  Sacred  walkers caravan  to  Brighton.

10:30  AM Walkers  depart  to  the  falls  in  South  Natick

1:30  PM Sacred  Paddle  arrives  at  Community  Rowing ,  20  Nonantum  Rd.  Brighton (Time  is  approximate)

3:00  PM Ceremony  at  the  falls  in  South  Natick ,  58  Eliot  St.,  Natick,  MA

4:00  PM Potluck  Feast  and  Social  at  St.  Paul’s  Episcopal  Church,  39  E  Central  St,  Natick, MA  01760

Special  thanks  to  Gedakina,  Nipmuk  Nashaounk,  and  all  our  volunteers. 

Deer Island Memorial Announcement 2017.docx (2)

Amherst College Hosts a Healing Fire for Survivors of Sexual Violence

amherst college healing fire gedakina

The Healing Fire Initiative for Survivors of Sexual Violence, their friends, families and allies. Sponsored in part by Gedakina.org.

Opening Ceremony 1:00 pm on April 13th

Fire will burn until 1:00pm on April 14th

People who come to the healing fire are welcome to make offerings to the fire.  Wooden shims and sharpies will be provided and you are welcome to bring letters and pictures of your own.  Amherst College is honored to partner with Gedakina Inc. in an effort to provide a space for healing with our campus community.  In 2002 Gedakina cofounded the Healing Fire Initiative for Survivors of Sexual Violence. The purpose of the Healing Fire Initiative is to offer survivors of sexual violence a welcoming and comforting place to break the isolation they may feel, build community with other survivors, advocates, and supporters, and begin or continue their healing process. This program is now a regional initiative with organizations and colleges/universities across the United States adopting this award-winning program.  The Healing Fire will begin with an opening ceremony at 1:00 pm onThursday April 13th, on the Freshman Quad (directly across from the Frost Library entrance.  The fire will be burning until 1:00pm on April 14th and will staffed by faculty, staff and crisis support center staff throughout the 24 hour period.  Please feel free to stay for any amount of time that feels right for you.  In respect for attendees we ask that no photography or social media include faces of people unless you have explicit permission.

“When I sit in the light of the Healing Fire, there are no voices that tell me I am to blame, that I am the only one, or that I deserve to be assaulted.  When I sit in the light of the Healing Fire, I see the many kind faces before me.  I hear their stories and feel the warmth and wisdom that we share.  There is a power hear tonight,  As this fire symbolizes the strength of survivors, it also symbolizes our passion, our righteous anger, our commitment and hope for a future where our children will be free  of abuse and violence.” – A quote from a Survivor who attended a Healing Fire in Burlington, Vermont

Five College NAIS: A Reading with LeAnn Howe and Susan Power

leann howe susan power five college NAIS

From gedakina.org:  please join us for a reading by LeAnne Howe and Susan Power in association with “Living Waters, Animate Lands,” the Annual Five College Native American & Indigenous Studies Symposium, April 6-8, 2017 https://www.fivecolleges.edu/natam/events
 
Friday, April 7, Cole Assembly, Converse Hall, Amherst College
Symposium, 9am-5pm
Reception, 6:30pm
Reading, 7pm
 
LeAnne Howe (MFA) is an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. Her first novel Shell Shaker (Aunt Lute Books, 2001) received an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation. Equinoxes Rouge, the French translation, was the 2004 finalist for Prix Medici Estranger, one of France’s top literary awards. Evidence of Red (Salt Publishing, UK, 2005) won the Oklahoma Book Award for poetry and a Wordcraft Circle Award. Her most recent novel is Miko Kings: An Indian Baseball Story(Aunt Lute Books, 2007). Her latest two books Choctalking On Other Realities (Aunt Lute Books), a memoir, and Seeing Red/Hollywood’s Pixeled Skins: American Indians and Film (Michigan State University Press), a co-edited anthology of film reviews were both published in 2013. She is the Eidson Distinguished Professor of American Literature in the English Department at the University of Georgia, Athens. 
 
Susan Power (JD, MFA) is an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and a native Chicagoan. She is the author of three books, The Grass Dancer (a novel), Roofwalker (a story collection), and the new novel, Sacred WildernessThe Grass Dancer was awarded a PEN/Hemingway prize in 1995 and Roofwalker a Milkweed National Fiction Prize in 2002. Her short stories and essays have been widely published in journals, magazines and anthologies including: The Best American Short Stories of 1993, The Atlantic Monthly, The Paris Review, The Southern Review and Granta. Her fellowships include an Iowa Arts Fellowship, James Michener Fellowship, Radcliffe Bunting Institute Fellowship, Princeton Hodder Fellowship, USA Artists Fellowship, Loft McKnight Fellowship for 2015-16, and Native Arts and Cultures.
 
Sponsored by the Corliss Lamont Fund, the English and American Studies departments, the Frost Library Archives and Special Collections, and the Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies Program

Third Annual Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies Symposium April 6-8, 2017

the women elizabeth lapensee

Living Waters, Animate Lands

Traditional Ecological Knowledge:  Braiding Story, Skills and Sustenance with Hope for a Sustainable Future

SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

Thursday, April 6 (UMass Amherst Campus Center: Cape Cod Lounge)

6:30 pm Welcome Reception

7:00 pm Film: “The Spirit of Standing Rock”

Friday, April 7 (Amherst College, Converse Hall: Cole Assembly)

9:00 am Gathering, Welcome, Opening Ceremonies

9:30-11:00 Opening address and Animate Lands Panel

11:15-11:30 Break

11:30-1:00 Living Waters Panel

1:00-2:00 Buffet lunch for all participants

2:00-3:00 Roundtable Discussions – Speakers, FCNAIS faculty, participants

3:15-4:15 Roundtable Discussions – Speakers, FCNAIS faculty, participants

4:30-5:00 Summary Discussion and Closing (All)

6:30pm Evening Reception (Amherst College, Converse Hall: Cole Assembly lobby)

7:00pm Reading by LeAnne Howe and Susan Power

Saturday, April 8 (gather at Amherst College)

10:00-noon TEK plant walk

Featured Speakers

Fikret Berkes is Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba, and author of Sacred Ecology (Third Edition, Routledge, 2012)

John Banks is the Director of the Department of Natural Resources for the Penobscot Indian Nation and, as a representative of his nation, helped develop the  Penobscot River Restoration Project

Amberdawn LaFrance works for the Akwesasne Cultural Restoration Program, part of the Environmental Division of the Akwesasne/St. Regis Mohawk Tribe, which recently produced a Climate Change Adaptation Plan for the nation.

Natalie Michelle is a citizen of Penobscot nation and a Ph.D. Candidate in  Ethnobotany and Adaptive Management at the University of Maine, Orono.

With a dual background in art and marine science, Elizabeth James Perry works for the Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribal Historic Preservation office.

Nicholas James Reo is a citizen of Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians and Assistant Professor of Native American and Environmental Studies at Dartmouth College, where where he studies Indigenous knowledge and ecological stewardship on Indigenous lands.

LeAnne Howe is an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. She writes fiction, poetry, screenplays, creative non-fiction, plays and scholarship that primarily deal with American Indian and Native American experiences.

Susan Power is an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and a native Chicagoan. She is the author of three books, The Grass Dancer (a novel), Roofwalker (a story collection), and the new novel, Sacred Wilderness.

Judy Dow is an Abenaki educator who specializes in sharing indigenous environmental knowledge with youth. A basketmaker and artist, she incorporates traditional ecological knowledge into her art and her teaching.

Go here for a full schedule and list of speakers.

Sponsored in part by Gedakina.org.