Festival Goers Celebrate Native American Culture

gavin alden pocumtuck homelands festival recorder

As 64-year-old Lenny Novak of Wakefield, N.H. tended his booth at the Pocumtuck Homelands Festival Saturday, he reconnected with old friends and shared stories with new acquaintances.

For Novak and his girlfriend Kelly Mowers, the festival is rather like an Old Home Day for Native Americans and for those who share an interest in their culture. “It’s like a family,” he said. “Everybody’s like-minded here. They appreciate the native ways.”

Novak, a member of the Abenaki tribe, and Mowers, of the Micmac tribe, were two of the vendors operating a booth along Unity Park’s waterfront Saturday, immersing passersby in Native American culture, art, music, food and history.

See the full article by Shelby Ashline in the Greenfield Recorder.

Photography by Matt Burkhartt (that’s my son Gavin with his buddy Alden!).

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Native American Heritage on Display at Annual Festival

Wabanaki Basketmaking

Folks in Bar Harbor got to experience a little taste of history. The annual Native American Festival and Basketmakers market brought music, dance, and a lesson in culture to Downeast Maine.

“You know Maine a lot of times doesn’t really know much about indigenous population so it’s a wonderful gathering of artisans and drummers and sharing.”

Each handcrafted item represents the beauty and culture of the Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot people. For many visitors it’s a chance to meet artists and learn about contemporary Wabanaki art from the Maritimes.

“It’s a wonderful thing to see each other and share our music with them. We are a strong part of Maine history and we would like to bring that back.”

See the full article by Alyssa Thurlow on WABI 5.