Jeanne Brink to be Honored at Middlebury College

jeanne brink abenaki basketmaker

From the Feb. 22, 2018 article in VTDigger.org.

Middlebury… will honor four other distinguished men and women with honorary degrees this year:

Jeanne A. Brink is an Abenaki artist and activist. She conducts workshops and programs on Western Abenaki storytelling, history, language, culture, basket making, oral tradition, dance, games, and current issues throughout Vermont and New England. Tracing her Abenaki heritage back to the early 1700s, she continues the tradition of Western Abenaki ash splint and sweetgrass fancy basketry as a master basket maker. Brink has served on the Vermont Commission for Native American Affairs, the Lake Champlain Basin Program Cultural Heritage and Recreation Advisory Committee, and many other local organizations. She is the author of several books about Abenaki art and language.

The Middlebury College Commencement ceremony will take place on the main quadrangle at 10 a.m. on Sunday, May 27. More than 5,000 family members and friends are expected to attend.

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Vermont Folklife Center Offering Apprenticeships

The Vermont Folklife Center announces the continuation of the Vermont Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program for its 24th year. Initiated to support Vermont’s living cultural heritage, the program provides stipends of up to $2,000 as honoraria and to cover such expenses as materials and travel. Under the auspices of the program, traditional arts such as blacksmithing, Abenaki basket making, Franco American singing, and Bhutanese Nepali folk dancing have received support.

A traditional arts apprenticeship brings teachers and learners together who share a common commitment to keeping these art forms alive. It pairs a community-acknowledged master artist who has achieved a high level of expertise in his or her art form with a less-experienced apprentice. The master and apprentice jointly plan when, where, and what they expect to accomplish over the course of the apprenticeship. Apprenticeship schedules reflect the time constraints of both master and apprentice and range from short-term, intensive sessions to meetings spread over the course of a year.

Read the full announcement here.

Vermont Indigenous Youth Essay Contest

Sponsored by the Vermont Commission on Native American Affairs:

The purpose of the Vermont Indigenous Youth Essay Contest is to promote a sense of pride and community among indigenous youth in the State of Vermont. The commission would like to foster positivity surrounding identity and how their unique perspective brings value to self and the communities they belong to.

Eligibility: The contest is for indigenous students in two categories: Grades 7 through 8 and 9 through 12 who are living in the State of Vermont. Students must identify as Native American or First Nations.

Rules: Please answer the essay question below in 1000 words or less. Submissions can be emailed to Jennifer.lavoie@vermont.gov or mailed to the Vermont Commission on Native American Affairs, 1 National Life Drive, Davis Building 6th Floor, Montpelier, VT 05620-0501. The deadline for submission is May 15. Results will be announced at the Heritage Celebration at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum on June 24. The Moccasin Tracks Radio Program will be hosting participants from this contest for a radio program on May 18.

Question: How does your indigenous heritage inform the way that you walk through the world?

Prize: Students who receive recognition for their essays will receive an award from the Vermont Commission on Native American Affairs and all students will select from a list of experiences with an indigenous community member. Examples of an experience may be learning a particular craft, such as twining, beadwork, or finger weaving, or spending an afternoon with a chief or other leader in the community. Students can elect to participate in the Moccasin Tracks Radio Program as well.

Link to a pdf file of this announcement: Indigenous-Heritage-Essay-Contest

Msaskek: Plainfield, Vermont Brook Naming Ceremony

plainfield mskaskek ceremony brink

A photo essay on the very enjoyable blog Fotogosaurus gives us a participant’s viewpoint on the recent brook-naming celebration in Plainfield, Vermont. Elder and linguist Jeanne Brink, with her husband Doug and many other townspeople and officials, offered sweetgrass as part of their acknowledgement during the naming ceremony. You can join this momentous occasion by visiting the post