The Pessamit Innu Discuss HydroQuebec

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From Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People:

We are super excited to welcome back our cousins- Council Members from the Pessamit Innu to New Hampshire to discuss the destruction that the HydroQuebec dams have created on their reservation in Canada.
If you would like to hear their informative yet heartbreaking presentation you have 2 opportunities:
July 18, 2017, 7 pm at All Saints Parish in Brookline, MA
July 19, 2017, at 7 pm at Nashua Public Library, 2 Court St., Nashua, NH
I hope to see some of you there!

Pictured above is Chief Simon and Grand Council members of the Pessamit Innu and our Sag8mo and Sag8mo Squaw (taken last fall).

 

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Return to the River Part 1: Franklin, NH’s First Inhabitants

paul pouliot franklin nh elodie reed
Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People Chief Paul Pouliot stands for a portrait on a fishing and observation deck along the Winnipesaukee River in Franklin. He is in front the bend in the river by Odell Park, a place he said would have provided indigenous people abundant fishing as well as good grounds for agriculture for thousands of years.

Beneath cool, overcast skies, Paul Pouliot took in the land, the river, the trees – all the geophysical features – of Franklin’s Odell Park.

The chief of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People looked past the empty baseball field, the dilapidated mill buildings and the developed river banks. Eyeing the U-shaped bend where the river slowed, Pouliot knew – that’s where his Native American ancestors would have fished.

He pointed to the spot just in front of the historic Riverbend Mill, under renovation for an affordable housing project. It was downstream from the river’s rapids, where local community partners are suggesting a whitewater play park can be installed to attract eco-adventure tourists and help revitalize New Hampshire’s second poorest city.

The natural resource Franklin is turning to for its new lifeblood, Pouliot pointed out, is why people came to the area in the first place.

Read the full article by Elodie Reed in the Concord Monitor, the first in a multi-part story.

A Day in the Life of Paul and Denise Pouliot, Part 2

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An integral part of Native American society is that people are judged not by what wealth they hold, but by what wealth they can give to others. This attitude is clearly expressed by the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People and its nonprofit social and cultural services organization, COWASS (Coos) North America. As Sagamore (sag- 8mor) of this band, Paul Pouliot and his wife Denise are committed to preserve their culture, traditions, and way of life. They have spent their time furthering education regarding the Abenaki people.

Read Part 2 of the story by Cathy Allyn on page 2 of The Baysider newspaper. This is a multi-part story, so watch for more.

A Day in the Life of Paul and Denise Pouliot

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There is no typical day in Paul Pouliot’s life. When the phone rings, it might be Homeland Security, a state archeologist, the Department of Justice, a social worker from anywhere in the country, or a museum curator. Is he some sort of government mastermind? A genius academic? A think tank guru? Pouliot’s calling surely has elements of all of those, but quite simply, he is a sagamore, the chief of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People.

Read the story by Cathy Allyn on page 5 of The Baysider newspaper. This is a multi-part story, so watch for more.

PS There’s a nice article on ash splint basketmaking on page 3 also!