Testimony at VTNDCAP’s Hosting of the NRC in Brattleboro

On May 25, 2017, the Vermont Nuclear Decommissioning Citizens Advisory Panel (VTNDCAP) hosted members of the Federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at Brattleboro Area Middle School’s (BAMS) multipurpose room. On the agneda were presentations and a public comment period for the proposed sale of Vermont Yankee (VY) by Entergy  to Northstar Group Services (Vermont Public Service Board Docket # 8880). This author, representing Elnu Abenaki, with the Nulhegan and Koasek Abenaki, offered testimony in support of our participation in the procedure.

Video thanks to Brattleboro Community Television.

VT Nuclear Decommissioning Citizens Advisory Panel: VT NDCAP Mtg 3/23/17

The Vermont Nuclear Decommisioning Citizens Advisory Panel held a meeting at the BAMS multipurpose room Thursday evening, March 23, 2017, to begin to address PSB Docket #8880. The case concerns the sale of the shuttered VT Yankee nuclear power plant (VY) in Vernon, VT, by Entergy Corp. to NorthStar Group Services. Elnu Abenaki have been granted Intervenor status by the PSB and will be participating in the discussions about the site, its restoration, and proposals for its subsequent use. This author offered a statement in support of Abenaki concerns as the process begins; that testimony can be found at 1:53:15 in the video from Brattleboro Community TV.

The Vernon Dam Part 2 from BHS and BAMS: Flooding Wantastegok

This is Part 2 of a two-part story, within the podcast series from Brattleboro Historical Society, produced by Joe Rivers and his BAMS history students. You can check out Part 1 here. It gives additional background to the subsuming of critical areas in Sokwakik, and particularly the flooding of  the Retreat Meadows, by the completion of the Vernon, Vermont hydroelectric dam in 1909. Prior to this date, the now-flooded meadows – known as mskodak in Aln8baiwi – were prime farmland for the Sokwakiak who dwelt here, and subsequently the European settlers that arrived in the mid-1700’s. There are multiple newspaper reports of native burials being exhumed within this alluvial bowl, just west of the mouth of the Wantastekw (I will be documenting them here over time). Sokoki Abenaki heritage and interests were ignored and ravaged, a situation which remains ongoing and challenging.

In the Name of Enlightenment and Progress: Dark Days in Sokwakik

The latest podcast from Brattleboro Historical Society, with Joe Rivers and his BAMS history students. It gives some good background to the subsuming of critical areas in Sokwakik, and the mid-Kwanitekw valley in general, by the construction of the Vernon, Vermont hydroelectric dam early in the last century. Many acres of riverside land were condemned to be flooded in the name of progress, the first project of its kind in the region, with many more to follow. This was a for-profit venture by a group of both local and regional businessmen, to generate power for distant markets at the expense of everything else. Sokoki Abenaki heritage and interests, being a riverine-centric culture, were ignored and ravaged, a situation which remains ongoing and challenging. The resulting impoundment was later accessed and the land further degraded by the construction of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant immediately upstream of the dam itself.

Brattleboro Historical Society Podcast e71: First Peoples Part 1

Early Vermont histories portrayed this area’s aboriginal peoples as transients who occasionally passed through southern Vermont, en route to and from Northern New York and Canada, but were ultimately not residents of the area and therefor had little claim on these lands.

In this podcast [BAMS history teacher] Joe Rivers and his intrepid band of middle school historians show that those early Vermont histories were very much mistaken.

This podcast is part I of a two-part series.

Produced October 20, 2016