Abbe Museum Opens People of the First Light Exhibition

abbe museum exhibit doll

The Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor, the first and only Smithsonian Affiliate in Maine, will open a new permanent exhibit May 1. “People of the First Light” explores the life, history and culture of Wabanaki people.

Read the full announcement in the Portland Press Herald.

Advertisements

Edward Curtis and Wabanaki Perspectives at Portland Museum of Art

Cayuse Mother Edward Curtis Portland Museum Art

George Neptune, a Passamaquoddy basketmaker, calls the images heartbreaking. Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko, director of the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor, says they’re challenging. And canoe maker David Moses Bridges can’t get past the sadness. “If you look into their faces you can see the sadness,” Bridges says in a recorded gallery audio tour. “You can see the pain and the suffering that they had to endure, that they are enduring at the time this photograph was taken.”

Bridges makes that observation while describing his reaction to the cream-colored photograph “Cayuse Mother and Child,” taken by Edward Curtis in 1910. It is one of two dozen images that make up the third-floor exhibition at the Portland Museum of Art, “Edward Curtis: Selections from the North American Indian,” on view through May 29.

Full story at the Portland Press-Herald.

Wabanaki Artist Fellowship Offered

jeremy frey basket abbe museum

Basket by Jeremy Frey, Abbe Museum, Bar Harbor, Maine.

The second annual fellowship program to help Wabanaki artists promote their work within the greater artistic communities has been announced by the Abbe Museum and Dawnland LLC.

Three fellowships will be awarded to provide support for travel, lodging and other costs associated with exhibiting at Indian art markets in Maine and New Mexico. The submission deadline is midnight April 15.

The fellowships are part of the museum’s “efforts to foster and promote contemporary Wabanaki art in both a regional and national context,” said Abbe Museum President and CEO Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko.

Full article at the Mount Desert Islander.

Of Fish and Families

great bend vernon vt winter 2015

The phrase “…a recognition that power, history and culture matter” is at the core of the schism of awareness between traditional and modern cultures. Over and over again, separation wields its cold, soul-less blade; only with a warm, healing touch – one person at a time – can life be encouraged and health restored. Kchi wliwni, great thanks, to Carol for sharing this story. Full post here.

“The problem with policies and programs developed to serve general populations is that they are too often decontextualized and ahistorical. They fail to incorporate a recognition that power, history and culture matter. The external forces tribes deal with make innovation challenging: unequal power relationships between tribes and federal policy makers and funders; the imposition of Euro-American values and ideologies; Federal laws that limit tribal sovereignty (e.g., Public Law 280 and the Adoption and Safe Families Act); Euro-American institutions, organizational structures, and practice approaches; and legacies of colonial oppression. The reality we all face is more than responding to urgent contemporary issues. Many of the challenges tribal people experience now have roots in historical legacies of unresolved trauma.”

Carol A. Hand, mother, educator, writer, advocate, and passionate worker for healing and transformation, is an enrolled member of the Sokaogon Ojibwe Community, one of the 6 bands of Ojibwe people located in what is now the state of Wisconsin. Carol shares her thoughts and experiences in her blog Voices From the Margins; her intention for creating this blog is to encourage dialogue about possibilities and support for alternate ways of communicating that celebrate the inclusiveness of diversity.