A Story of Survival Amid the Artifacts

robert goodby norma wilson

Archeology provided the backdrop for a story of human survival during a presentation of “Digging into Native History in New Hampshire: Whatever happened to the Abenakis?” at Seabrook Library.

The New Hampshire Humanities Council co-sponsored the library’s presentation by anthropologist Dr. Robert Goodby, associate professor of anthropology at Franklin Pierce University and author of more than 100 reports delving into New England prehistoric archaeology.

Goodby began his presentation to several dozen audience members with an explanation of his passion for finding and studying artifacts. He said his interest in studying anthropology began at the University of New Hampshire but he became engrossed with archaeology when he found a 7,000-year-old object at his first paid archeological dig. He said the experience changed his life.

“Archaeology is about people,” he said. “I asked myself, ‘How can I use this object to find out about people and their stories.’”

Full story at Seacoast Online.

Advertisements

Fort Necessity Welcomes Members of Abenaki Tribe

abenaki exhibit fort necessity

The National Park Service is welcoming members of the Elnu Abenaki tribe and artists from the Vermont Abenaki Artists Association this Saturday and Sunday for a weekend of cultural heritage programs at Fort Necessity National Battlefield in Farmington where the 262nd anniversary of the battle will also be observed.

Full story at the Uniontown Herald-Standard.

Penobscots Vacate Seat in Maine Legislature

penobscot kirk francis maine

The Penobscot Nation is formally vacating a seat the tribe has held in the Maine Legislature for more than 150 years and, instead, plans to select an ambassador to work with the state and federal governments.

More than a mere title change, the switch from non-voting state representative to a full-time “government relations ambassador” is a symbolic and historic shift that reflects the tensions between state officials and leaders of Maine’s federally recognized Indian tribes, most notably the Penobscots and the Passamaquoddy Tribe.

Full story at the Portland Press-Herald.

Wabanaki Tribes Receive Dept. of Interior Grant

isle au haut forest

WASHINGTON, June 10 — The U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Park Service announced that it intends to award a $145,000 cooperative agreement to the Wabanaki Tribes of Maine for community history and archeology projects at the Isle au Haut.

The agency description of the grant states: “Specifically, the recipient will:
1) Conduct research on traditional uses of Isle au Haut by Wabanaki, including oral histories, placenames, and material culture collections, at Isle au Haut and among Wabanaki communities.
2) Conduct research and education to develop and deliver resource stewardship training for Wabanaki youth and community members about archeology, and develop and deliver training and workshops to NPS staff about stewardship of heritage resources in association with tribal communities.
3) Participate in consultation meetings with the Wabanaki tribal partners about research and education programs about the Wabanaki, in partnerships with the NPS.”

The funding opportunity number is NPS-16-NERO-0077 (CFDA 15.954).

For more information, contact Keith Zotti, 215/597-9153.

Shutesbury MA OKs Solar Project on Possible Burial Ground

shutesbury hearing

Tensions flared again Tuesday  as the Planning Board approved a special permit for a 30-acre solar installation. After nearly a year of debate, the permit is a compromise between the developer and residents concerned about a possible Native American burial ground.

Full story in The Greenfield Recorder.

Abbe Museum’s Exhibition Tells Difficult Native Stories

abbe museum birchbark container

If nothing else, Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko wants people who visit the Abbe Museum to leave with one piece of knowledge firmly planted forever in their brain: Native people still live in Maine.

“It’s amazing how many of our visitors don’t realize that,” the museum director said. “They’re always surprised.”

Read about how the Abbe Museum is telling its story in a new way. (via Portland Press-Herald)