Wabanaki Tribes Growing Heirloom Seeds for Heritage & Health

wabanaki ancestral squash

Maine’s Passamaquoddy people are once again growing and eating ancestral crops and saving the often rare seeds. These simple yet significant acts are tied to new research that sheds light on the sophisticated agriculture and accompanying plant-centric diet of the early Wabanaki people of northeastern North America, who lived and farmed in what we call Maine for 12,000 years before the European migration and colonization…

Planting these heirloom seeds is part of a wider effort by the Passamaquoddy to increase the amount of food produced on tribal land.  All the ancestral seeds have been linked to tribes of the Wabanaki Confederacy, which includes the Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Maliseet, Micmac and Abenaki.

In 2014, Koasek Abenakis, the Seeds of Renewal Program and retired Johnson State College humanities professor Frederick M. Wiseman, who is Abenaki, gave these ancestral seeds to the Passamaquoddy tribe at Motahkokmikuk. The following spring, the seeds returned to Passamaquoddy soil and flourished.

Read the full article in the Press Herald here.

 

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richholschuh

The world is a big place. This is how it appears to me. Your results may differ.

12 thoughts on “Wabanaki Tribes Growing Heirloom Seeds for Heritage & Health”

  1. That is quite an accounting (I just had the time to read it through). Thank you for sharing it, Trace. The story of Wheelock’s earliest days, with Samson Occom, is one I would like to study further. I know a little about it, and have Colin Calloway’s book on the subject, but haven’t had the opportunity to read it yet. And Dartmouth is so close by to us; I hope to be able to cultivate some further connections there. I did note that the speaker/author of the essay identified Samson Occom as Mohican, whereas he was Mohegan, but that is a common confusion!

    Liked by 1 person

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