Tantaquidgeon Museum Keeps Mohegan Culture Alive

melissa-tantaquidgeon-mohegan-museum

Late in the autumn of 1931, a half-blind, crutch-bound Mohegan tribesman hatched an ambitious plan: to establish a museum to display and preserve his tribe’s cultural artifacts for future generations. Wednesday, the Tantaquidgeon Indian Museum celebrated 85 years of fulfilling that mission – a milestone tribe members say makes it the oldest and most influential Native American museum in the world.

“John Tantaquidgeon and his two children, Gladys and Harold, were really the dreamers behind this whole thing,” Mohegan Medicine Woman Melissa Tantaquidgeon Zobel, Gladys Tantaquidgeon’s great-niece and once-pupil, said. “They had this philosophy that it’s hard to hate someone who you know a lot about, and by doing this as a labor of love they were able to share their language, their history and their culture with people.”

Full coverage at the Norwich Bulletin.

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richholschuh

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